Tag Archives: Trish Reid

Winter Ginko: City Botanic Gardens

The sun was blazingly beautiful again today, and my head was still swimming with haiku thanks to yesterday’s ginko. I am excited to post these poems from four of the poets who joined me on the day, and later in the week, I will post poems from the three remaining poets. It’s always a thrill to see so many fine poems written into being…

*****

masts swing –
hundreds of joggers
up the tempo

*

muddy hull takes the river to the sea

mr oCean

Web Bird

[photograph by Andy Smerdon]

sunday shadows
a soldier bird
breaks bread

*

through the fence
a chinese boy tries speaking duck

Andrew Phillips

 Wb Haiku

[photograph by Andy Smerdon]

august wind
tight strings resonate
a winter song

*

blue feathers and orange beak
a subtle enquiry

Andy Smerdon

044

[photograph by Andy Smerdon]

light and shade on the duck pond       passing

*

partitioned park seats
for the homeless
no sleep

Trish Reid

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Between Thistles: Variation #4 by John Wainwright

After Chloe’s exploration of humour in variation #3, John has countered with an exploration of  the darker moments the poem conjured. While the first half of the poem is similar to the original, the second half breaks new ground and shifts the tome of the poem dramatically. And as John so aptly pointed out in his email to me, ‘Andy’s three word verse (link #10) is a statement covering a decade and the full spectrum of Australian politics’.

So much to enjoy here…

*****

Between Thistles: A New Junicho
Started: 12 April 2013 – Finished: 30 April 2013
Written between: Ashley Capes, Chloë Callistemon, Cindy Keong, Chris Lynch, John Wainwright, Andrew Phillips, Rachael Briggs, Andy Smerdon, Lee-Anne Davie, Trish Reid

Link #1 (3 lines) – hokku / shasei

between thistles
the crane’s
Egyptian walk

(Ashley Capes)

Link #2 (2 lines) – waki / cultural (literature)

she hushes the bundle
in a river basket

(Andrew Phillips)

Link #3 (3 lines) – daisan / cultural (film)

fan rotors beat
The End
to the smell of napalm

(Chloe Callistemon)

Link #4 (2 lines) – verse / shasei

recycling at 2:30am
moonlight on bitumen

(Chris Lynch)

Link #5 (3 lines) – verse / shasei

moth seeks out
only dark spaces
tired I turn off the light

(Trish Reid)

Link #6 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (art)

Caravaggio fades in from black
is that a pallet knife?

(John Wainwright)

Link #7 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (religion)

he makes the sign
with crossed fingers
crucifix

(Lee-Anne Davie)

Link #8 (2 lines) – verse / gendai

remorse-
a bouquet of verbs

(Cindy Keong)

Link #9 (3 lines) – verse / gendai

floods and locusts
here come the horsemen
swine flew

(Rachael Briggs)

Link #10 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (politics)

overboard
opportunity drifts

(Andy Smerdon)

Link #11 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (music)

bind your soul
to the beast that waits
at the crossroads

(Andy Smerdon)

Link #12 (2 lines) – ageku / shasei

in rifle sight
my enemy’s eyes

(Chris Lynch)

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Between Thistles: Variation #2 by Cindy Keong

It has been exciting to have variations on Between Thistles arrive in my inbox these past few days… so many roads left unexplored in the original that these remixes are discovering. Here is Cindy Keong’s remix to kick start your Friday night.

*****

Between Thistles: A New Junicho
Started: 12 April 2013 – Finished: 30 April 2013
Written between: Ashley Capes, Chloë Callistemon, Cindy Keong, Chris Lynch, Vuong Pham, Trish Reid and Lee-Anne Davie

Link #1 (3 lines) – hokku / shasei

between thistles
the crane’s
Egyptian walk

(Ashley Capes)

*

Link #2 (2 lines) – waki / cultural (literature)

Out! Damn dog
brought the bloody river home!

(John Wainwright)

*

Link #3 (3 lines) – daisan / cultural (film)

a gecko
makes the theatre
more Australian

(Vuong Pham)

*

Link #4 (2 lines) – verse / shasei

recycling at 2:30am
moonlight on bitumen

(Chris Lynch)

*

Link #5 (3 lines) – verse / shasei

possums on the roof
a sudden clap
of thunder

(Cindy Keong)

*

Link #6 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (art)

Van Gogh hears
the light in each stroke

(Lee-Anne Davie)

*

Link #7 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (religion)

winter solitude
the garden angel
frost covered

(Vuong Pham)

*

Link #8 (2 lines) – verse / gendai

the tollway flickers
another promise

(Ashley Capes)

*

Link #9 (3 lines) – verse / gendai

fever sweats
the memory of glaciers
fading…

(Chris Lynch)

*

Link #10 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (politics)

global warming
my GUCCI wallet cracks

(Vuong Pham)

*

Link #11 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (music)

second chord
of the Elgar
snaps my bow

(Chloe Callistemon)

*

Link #12 (2 lines) – ageku / shasei

songs-many tongued-
mend the sun

(Trish Reid)

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Between Thistles: Variation #1 by Chris Lynch

When Between Thistles came to an end, I invited each of the participating poets to revisit the poems on offer (all 100+ suggested links) with a view to curating their own version. My aim was for this to show the depth of writing on offer and to explore the many roads this poem left unexplored. Chris Lynch has risen to the challenge, so here is his variation on the New Junicho, Between Thistles.

*****

Between Thistles: A New Junicho
Started: 12 April 2013 – Finished: 30 April 2013
Written between: Ashley Capes, Andrew Phillips, Chloë Callistemon, Phillip Ellis, Cindy Keong, Rachael Briggs, Chris Lynch, Dhyan, Trish Reid, and Andy Smerdon

Link #1 (3 lines) – hokku / shasei

between thistles
the crane’s
Egyptian walk

(Ashley Capes)

*

Link #2 (2 lines) – waki / cultural (literature)

she hushes the bundle
in a river basket

(Andrew Phillips)

*

Link #3 (3 lines) – daisan / cultural (film)

fan rotors beat
The End
to the smell of napalm

(Chloë Callistemon)

*

Link #4 (2 lines) – verse / shasei

summer showers
fan the Gold Coast

(Phillip Ellis)

*

Link #5 (3 lines) – verse / shasei

possums on the roof
a sudden clap
of thunder

(Cindy Keong)

*

Link #6 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (art)

bad Saturn! put it down!
Goya should paint a bell on him

(Rachael Briggs)

*

Link #7 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (religion)

meditating
the old jizo ignores
his red beanie

(Chris Lynch)

*

Link #8 (2 lines) – verse / gendai

damn!
nothing happens.

(Dhyan)

*

Link #9 (3 lines) – verse / gendai

she misses his cheek
mouth wanders
off

(Trish Reid)

*

Link #10 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (politics)

a new man rises
such rough beast

(Phillip Ellis)

*

Link #11 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (music)

to have been
two hands clapping
with Freddie

(Chloë Callistemon)

*

Link #12 (2 lines) – ageku / shasei

beneath bare feet
mud squelches

(Andy Smerdon)

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New Junicho: Between Thistles (Links #11 – #12)

With eighteen poems shared, Between Thistles is almost at an end… one selection remains, and again, I have been deliberating between a handful of the poems, reading each as the ageku to see how the image not only breaks new ground but allows us to briefly circle back to Ashley’s hokku, the evocative title poem, ‘between thistles’.

But before I go into detail about the 5 poems that have been sharing the place of the ageku, I want to thank everyone who has read and participated in our New Junicho. It has been one of the most exciting writing projects that I have taken part in. The energy and creativity that you have brought to the composition of this poem has been (in the most positive way) overwhelming. It has been a highlight of my day to check in with your responses and to watch this poem take shape. I will miss it, but there is still room for exploration… To everyone who participated, check your inboxes as I will be emailing you with an invitation to curate your own version of Between Thistles from the links submitted. I think it will be exciting to go back through each of the call outs and see where you may have taken the poem and to consider the many paths a poem like this can take.

Now, to the four poems that I have been considering for the ageku. The poems are, Lee-Anne’s ‘in the fading light’, Trish’s ‘songs-many-tongued’, Chloe’s ‘wind slips a tune’, Chris’s ‘in rifle sight’, and Andy’s ‘beneath bare feet’. Each of these poems leap daringly from John’s ‘Battle of Brighton’ and link us back to”between thistles’ and in doing so shift the feeling of the hokku; allowing us to read the poem with new insight.

Lee-Anne’s ‘in fading light’ gives closure to the battle we have left behind and in reading on, welcomes us to take a deeper look between the thistles where the Egyptian crane steps; the closing line ‘we study all that is’ singing with a deep sense of wabi.

Trish’s ‘songs-many-tongued’ offers such warmth; the idea that a diversity of voices singing in harmony can mend the sun enchanted me on first reading.

Chloe’s ‘wind slips a tune’ has a wonderful sense of lightness; the song beneath her feet adding music to each step of the crane.

Chris’s ‘in rifle sight’ refocuses the menace of the battle and leaves us eye to eye with an enemy. In reading on, the force of the word ‘enemy’ shifts the tone of the hokku, giving the crane a darker edge and bringing into focus another being between the thistles, hunted by the crane.

Andy’s ‘beneath bare feet’ gives the senses a real slap, as it is not only the feel of the mud that hits us here, it is the smell, the sound and the visual of the feet disappearing. This, like Chloe’s poem, connects us to the crane as it steps between thistles.

Each of these poems make a wonderful addition to the Junicho, but it is time to make a choice… to close, I have selected the poem that creates the greatest shift in the tone of the hokku; ‘in rifle sight’ by Chris Lynch.

But as I said before… let’s not view this as an ending. I look forward to posting multiple versions of this New Junicho over the coming days.

I would love for you to share this poem widely, as it is the keeper of many riches.

*****

Between Thistles: A New Junicho
Started: 12 April 2013 – Finished: 30 April 2013
Written between:
Ashley Capes, Simon Kindt, Chloe Callistemon, Chris Lynch, Trish Reid, John Wainwright, Lee-Anne Davie, Andrew Phillips, Cindy Keong, Phillip Ellis,

Link #1 (3 lines) – hokku / shasei

between thistles
the crane’s
Egyptian walk

(Ashley Capes)

Link #2 (2 lines) – waki / cultural (literature)

the noose of a circling skein
called down by Carver’s barreled goose

(Simon Kindt)

Link #3 (3 lines) – daisan / cultural (film)

fan rotors beat
The End
to the smell of napalm

(Chloe Callistemon)

Link #4 (2 lines) – verse / shasei

recycling at 2:30am
moonlight on bitumen

(Chris Lynch)

Link #5 (3 lines) – verse / shasei

moth seeks out
only dark spaces
tired I turn off the light

(Trish Reid)

Link #6 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (art)

Caravaggio fades in from black
is that a pallet knife?

(John Wainwright)

Link #7 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (religion)

he makes the sign
with crossed fingers
crucifix

(Lee-Anne Davie)

Link #8 (2 lines) – verse / gendai

global autumn
H5N1 migrates

(Andrew Phillips)

Link #9 (3 lines) – verse / gendai

waking up
with winter
beside me

(Cindy Keong)

Link #10 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (politics)

a new man rises
such rough beast

(Phillip Ellis)

Link #11 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (music)

the Mods won the
Battle of Brighton Beach
The Who?

(John Wainwright)

Link #12 (2 lines) – ageku / shasei

in rifle sight
my enemy’s eyes

(Chris Lynch)

* shasei – sketched from life – lived experience, observational, uncontrived.
* gendai – modernist – atypical structure, tone or content.

*****

Responses to Link #11:

The call for music went out and four poets came to play! The offerings from Chris, John, Andy and Chloe continue the energy of previous links and approach the concept of music from some wildly different viewpoints.

Chris looks out from the moshpit as the collision of bodies sends sparks flying skyward; John’s three poems move from the apocalyptic movement of ‘valkyrie ride’ (with a surge of Wagner) to the battle of Brighton Beach and the balls-out soundtrack of Daltrey, Townshend, Entwistle and Moon; Andy takes us to the crossroads where the finger-picked blues of Robert Johnson ‘herald the beast’; and Chloe takes us on a discordant musical odyssey where we clap along with Freddie Mercury, break with the beautiful force of Elgar and wake to Beethoven’s cannon.

Such a diverse musical trip! One that has enriched my Sunday afternoon and taken our Junicho on one last turn before we reach our destination. So where did I leap to? I couldn’t resist the Battle of Brighton Beach, as it’s quite possibly the most playful take on a battle I have ever encountered. This selection welcomes John back into the poem and opens the call for the ageku, link #12.

For the ageku, we are looking for 2 lines of natural imagery / lived experience that continues the movement of the poem and in some way connects us back with the opening image. I plan to leave this link open for submission until 6pm Tuesday April 30 to give everyone ample time to pen their final offerings.

This poem has provided such a wonderful sense of community, so I hope that you all come out to play one last time.

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New Junicho: Between Thistles (Links #9 – #10)

Responses to Link #10:

It was a thrill to see the energy of the gendai phase continue; the verse on offer for link #10 vary from the wonderfully  satirical, ‘Mad Katter’s tea party’ (John) and ‘budgie’s snuggle’ (Trish), through the razor sharp political commentary of ‘a new man rises’ (Phillip), the deep resonance of ‘soldier biscuits for sale’ (Chris) and the natural beauty of ‘election promises’ (Vuong).

After reading each poem multiple times, I became overwhelmed at the state of politics in our nation. Such is the power of so many of the links submitted; and in this power lies possibility. The Junicho would be richer for the addition of many of these poems, but there must be one that owns the 10th position and propels us towards an ending…

There are two poems that I have juggled for a number of hours now; placing each one into the Junicho, reading and re-reading the complete poem and then considering where it could lead us… the two poems are Chris’s ‘soldier biscuits for sale’  and Phillip’s ‘a new man rises’. In making my choice, I have decided to go with the directness of Phillip’s link and the energy it generates in leaping forward from Cindy’s ‘waking up’. The use of the word rises is the engine that propels this poem and while I might be showing my political leanings with this selection, this startling image confirmed my fear of the long winter we may wake to post the upcoming federal election…

I will, however, make one edit to the poem, and that is the removal of the brackets around the second line. It is my belief that the poem works more powerfully without them.

So with link #10 decided, link #11 is now open. Link #11 completes the six cultural links by calling for 3 lines with a music reference. After witnessing the uninhibited energy of Black Sabbath last night, I am eager to hear how each of you will make your words sing.

Take the leap and spread the word…

*****

Between Thistles: A New Junicho
Started: 12 April 2013 – Finished:
Written between:
Ashley Capes, Simon Kindt, Chloe Callistemon, Chris Lynch, Trish Reid, John Wainwright, Lee-Anne Davie, Andrew Phillips, Cindy Keong, Phillip Ellis,

Link #1 (3 lines) – hokku / shasei

between thistles
the crane’s
Egyptian walk

(Ashley Capes)

Link #2 (2 lines) – waki / cultural (literature)

the noose of a circling skein
called down by Carver’s barreled goose

(Simon Kindt)

Link #3 (3 lines) – daisan / cultural (film)

fan rotors beat
The End
to the smell of napalm

(Chloe Callistemon)

Link #4 (2 lines) – verse / shasei

recycling at 2:30am
moonlight on bitumen

(Chris Lynch)

Link #5 (3 lines) – verse / shasei

moth seeks out
only dark spaces
tired I turn off the light

(Trish Reid)

Link #6 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (art)

Caravaggio fades in from black
is that a pallet knife?

(John Wainwright)

Link #7 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (religion)

he makes the sign
with crossed fingers
crucifix

(Lee-Anne Davie)

Link #8 (2 lines) – verse / gendai

global autumn
H5N1 migrates

(Andrew Phillips)

Link #9 (3 lines) – verse / gendai

waking up
with winter
beside me

(Cindy Keong)

Link #10 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (politics)

a new man rises
such rough beast

(Phillip Ellis)

Link #11 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (music)
Link #12 (2 lines) – ageku / shasei

* shasei – sketched from life – lived experience, observational, uncontrived.
* gendai – modernist – atypical structure, tone or content.

*****

Response to Link #9:

I am just home after two massive nights of poetry (one launching Brisbane New Voices IV, which I will share details of very soon), and am eager to keep the Junicho moving. That said, my eyes are finding it hard to focus, so tonight, I am going to keep it brief…

Again, I have been swept away by the playful energy of the poems on offer for link #9. I have been checking in regularly and this gendai section has given me a genuine rush.

Many of these poems have seeded themselves in my brain, keeping me company and filling my head with their wildness. Several, will remain there for a long time… such is their resonance.

These poems include, Trish’s ‘she misses his cheek’, Cindy’s ‘waking up’, Chris’s ‘fever sweats’ and John’s uproarious, ‘number nine’.

So which one has made the leap into Between Thistles… for link #9 I have decided to wake up with winter and in doing so, welcome Cindy into the Junicho.

This means, we are now calling for link #10 – 2 lines with a political theme. I’ve got a feeling this one is going to keep the freewheeling energy of the last two links!

Leap boldly,

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New Junicho: Between Thistles (Links #7 – #8)

Responses to link #8:

With 20+ poems on offer for this link, I don’t feel I am able to do them all justice in a single response, so instead of responding to each poem, I felt it would be best to first, share some of my own thoughts on gendai haiku and then share the 3 poems that elbowed their way to the final shortlist.

First of all, here is another enlightening link with regards gendai haiku: http://gendaihaiku.com/.

To quote from Shiki, ‘Haiku advances only when it departs from the traditional style’, and so it is that gendai haiku provides one way forward for the form, welcoming innovation and encouraging writers (as Martin Lucas so elegantly put it in his essay, Haiku as Poetic Spell) to embrace the ‘little awkwardnesses’ and to resist the pressures towards conformity, complacency and mere competence. As well as the wealth of information that is available at Gendai Haiku, I also recommend immersing yourself in journals such as Roadrunner and Presence. Both journals continue to publish groundbreaking work; work that challenges the traditional paradigm.

And for me, reading has always been the way forward… to read and have an awareness of groundbreaking work is to be one step closer to writing it.

What I loved most about the offerings for link #8, was the freedom of their spirit. I thank you all for your innovation and sense of playfulness… to me, both are vital to the art of haiku.

While many of the poems here would add a richness to the Junicho – Rachael’s wildly stitched together words and Trish and Lee-Anne’s intense use of colour – there are three that continue to pull me deeper into their realm. The 3 poems, in no particular order are, Andrew’s ‘global autumn’, Dhyan’s ‘damn!’ and Cindy’s ‘remorse’. Each of these embraces the spirit of gendai and offers a unique way forward for the poem. They are playful, provocative and brimming with possibility.

So which way did I leap?

I couldn’t resist  flying into the swirling genetics of Andrew’s ‘global autumn’.

This means link #9 is now open! For link #9 We remain in the world of gendai haiku, so keep the freewheeling words coming… this time, we are looking for three lines.

Enjoy!

*****

Between Thistles: A New Junicho
Started: 12 April 2013 – Finished:
Written between:
Ashley Capes, Simon Kindt, Chloe Callistemon, Chris Lynch, Trish Reid, John Wainwright, Lee-Anne Davie

Link #1 (3 lines) – hokku / shasei

between thistles
the crane’s
Egyptian walk

(Ashley Capes)

Link #2 (2 lines) – waki / cultural (literature)

the noose of a circling skein
called down by Carver’s barreled goose

(Simon Kindt)

Link #3 (3 lines) – daisan / cultural (film)

fan rotors beat
The End
to the smell of napalm

(Chloe Callistemon)

Link #4 (2 lines) – verse / shasei

recycling at 2:30am
moonlight on bitumen

(Chris Lynch)

Link #5 (3 lines) – verse / shasei

moth seeks out
only dark spaces
tired I turn off the light

(Trish Reid)

Link #6 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (art)

Caravaggio fades in from black
is that a pallet knife?

(John Wainwright)

Link #7 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (religion)

he makes the sign
with crossed fingers
crucifix

(Lee-Anne Davie)

Link #8 (2 lines) – verse / gendai

global autumn
H5N1 migrates

(Andrew Phillips)

Link #9 (3 lines) – verse / gendai
Link #10 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (politics)
Link #11 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (music)
Link #12 (2 lines) – ageku / shasei

* shasei – sketched from life – lived experience, observational, uncontrived.
* gendai – modernist – atypical structure, tone or content.

*****

Responses to Link #7:

Again, I have been swept away by the energy of this poem and the poets who have stepped up to the ‘link #7 plate’ and had a swing…

Vuong starts proceedings with a small handful of poems, beginning with the warmth of dawn and a blessing, moving to the chill of winter and the exposed garden angel and arriving at, for me, the finest of his three poems, ‘searching for truth’. This image continues to resonate with me; the gentle movement of a page lifting in the breeze shows us that ‘the truth’ reveals itself when we too are open to its arrival; Chris offers a quietly playful image. The idea of a beanie itching the head of the old jizo (protector of deceased children) during meditation put a wide smile on my face; Phillip’s offering has a harder edge; in reading this, I sensed the watchmaker had lost his faith, after losing his sight; John engages in an inner dialogue and in doing so talks himself into having a little drink; Rachael drifts off during mass and despite being roused by a sharp elbow to the ribs, continues to question what it is to believe… the final line filled my head with the possibility of what she was dreaming about; Trish presents an image of beauty and devastation, where deaf men sign their cries; something (delightfully) wicked this way comes in the form of Lee-Anne’s poem, as she questions her faith by crossing her fingers while making the sign of the cross; Cindy gives us an image of vast natural beauty and locates us in the upper air of the Himalayas; and Andrew watches as the dog makes short work of the holy book… couldn’t help but think of that age old homework excuse, ‘my dog ate it.’

So many stepping stones, each one providing a solid platform for the poem to move forward. Before I make my decision, let me thank you all again for making this such a joy.

Now, to choose that stone. Four particular poems have had a jostling match in my head, but for link #7, I have gone with Lee-Anne’s satirical take on the sign of the cross.

This means we move into the gendai phase of the poem and the call is now open for link #8… 3 modernist lines that will take the poem in the direction of left field.

Embrace that risk-taking feeling!

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