Tag Archives: Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers

The New Folk XIV – Got That Mojo Workin’…

There are some great new releases ready to drop in the next couple of weeks. This Lost Shark is particularly excited about the new album from Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Mojo. This is the first new album from Petty with The Heartbreakers since 2002’s The Last DJ, so there is a great deal of anticipation. Here’s a taste of what to expect as well as a couple of other songs to ease you in to your Saturday night.

I Should Have Known It – Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers

Petty is one of those artists who is truly timeless. He has been knocking out classic songs for over three decades and has a sound that is completely his own. Back with The Heartbreakers, Petty is scintillating. The band sound (and look) energised, Mike Campbell’s is at his blinding best; the rhythm section of  Ron Blair & Steve Ferrone are air tight; Scott Thurston chugs away in the background and Benmont Tench… well, he is without a doubt, one of the best piano/keys men going around. I Should Have Known It is common territory for Petty & The Heartbreakers. Tom has written some incredible songs of rejection/lost love over the years and this is up there with his best. When Petty snarls into the mic, ‘It’s the last time you’re gonna hurt me’, rejection never sounded so good. Mojo is out on June 15.

Cocaine and Ashes – Son Volt

‘I’ve had strychnine, I thought I was dead / I snorted my father and I’m still alive / I did it because that’s how it’s done / I’m the same as everyone, just kinda lucky’

So starts Cocaine and Ashes, the opening track from Son Volt’s forthcoming album, American Central Dust. The song pays homage to ‘the human riff’, Keith Richards, who once claimed to have snorted his father’s ashes (later denying it). The sound here is sleepy, at times desperate… Gone are the more raucous guitar sounds of Farrar’s previous band, Uncle Tupelo, but found is the graceful playing of newcomer Mark Spencer (piano, pedal steel). I hope this new line up has a few albums in them, as American Central Dust, has the lazy brilliance and raw confidence that we have come to expect from Farrar & co.

Destroyer of the Void – Blitzen Trapper

Destroyer of the Void blends sweet country, pop and psychedelia in epic proportions. It is an ambitious song to open an album, but where would we be without ambition? Destroyer tips its hat to The Beatles, Queen, Dylan with The Band and countless others, while remaining completely original. It is great to see the band re-expanding their sonic scope after the focussed folk-rock of previous album Furr. Don’t get me wrong… I love their acoustic narratives but the space rock of Destroyer opens up the astral plane and demands further exploration.

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Songs of Defiance

Defiance is a personal characteristic that often gets a bad wrap, but let’s face it, there are times when we need to stand strong in the face of popular opinion and hold our ground. Lately, I’ve been feeling a little defiant, wanting to bare my teeth at the world and some of its inhabitants; wanting to lower my horns and meet the day head on. So here’s a clutch of songs from three men who aren’t afraid to make a stand… each song, shiver-inducing in its own way. Hope they help you carry the fire.

Room at the Top – Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers

Tom Petty is one of those rare artists, unflinchingly honest in his approach and able to tell it bullet-straight, while still sounding sweeter than sugarcane. When Petty sings, I’ve got a room at the top of the world tonight and I ain’t coming down, he does so with a quiet ferocity. Petty, the perpetual outsider, stakes his claim and is prepared to go down swinging in its defence.  This is the sound of a band, who never once believed rock was dead…

Hurt – Johnny Cash

While the NIN original is brilliant in its own right, Cash owns this song, his dying body and thinning voice giving these lyircs an otherworldly poignance. Cash stands at the threshold of life and delivers the closing lyric, If I could start again/ a million miles away/ I would keep myself/ I would find a way, with such certainty… there is no resignation here, just a man and the knowledge that everyone goes away in the end. And this is quite possibly one of the greatest clips ever produced.

Atlantic City – Bruce Springsteen

Everything here is stripped back to the core… the line between an honest man and a criminal blur, as does the line between life and death. Springsteen’s voice is at its harrowing best, but at the same time defiant, triumphant in its declaration, Everything dies baby that’s a fact/ but maybe everything that dies someday comes back/ Put your makeup on, fix your hair up pretty/ and meet me tonight in Atlantic City. This is the truth told simply… and death, theft, loneliness are part of that truth.

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