Tag Archives: Rosanna Licari

Stylus Poetry Journal #37 – Street/Life

A while back I was asked to edit issue #37 of Stylus Poetry Journal: Street/Life. This was an exciting prospect… the opportunity to assemble an issue of poetry that breathed life into the streets was irresistable. Since that time, Stylus has experienced some serious server issues, and is currently under repair. But to keep things moving, founding Stylus editor, Rosanna Licari and I have teamed up to bring you the Street/Life issue, via Another Lost Shark. The issue features twelve poets, each of them pulling us deeper into the streets & alleyways, highways and malls, that run like veins through our cities and towns. It has been a joy to work on and I hope that you find as much wisdom in these words as I did. But that’s enough from me… head on over to the Street/Life Issue and get up close and personal with this magnificent dozen:

Foreword

Amanda Joy
Andy Jackson
Ashley Capes
Emily XYZ
Hinemoana Baker
Jacqueline Turner
Jeremy Balius
Jessika Tong
Matt Rader
Max Ryan
Steve Kilbey
Suzanne Jones

* Reviews and other articles will be uploaded soon.

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Brisbane Writers Festival: Small Change & other poetic happenings

The mighty Small Change Press roll out the red tongues of three of their finest tomorrow at Brisbane Writers Festival. If you are in town, come along and make some (poetic) noise and get behind the poetry programmed as part of BWF 2009. If we all get behind it, they may just program more of it in 2010.

So here’s what’s happening:

BWF & Small Change Press presents:

Julie Beveridge, Nathan Shepherdson + Graham Nunn & Sheish Money with MC extraordinairre & co-founder of Small Change Press, David Stavanger.

Come and experience the wild and whirling words of these poets as they transform their poems into columns of air ready to be devoured by your hungry ears.
 
Date: Friday 11 September
Time: 5:15pm – 6:15pm
Venue: The Studio, State Library of QLD (SLQ)
Cost: Free

 

Earlier in the day, you can also catch FLIGHT.

FLIGHT = something is not quite right. QLD performance poets (and Charles Ulm disciples) Ghostboy & Pascalle Burton + guest pilot The Stress of Leisure present FLIGHT: their well feared Q150 experimental spoken word theatre in-flight entertainment for the first time in 2009 ,as part of the Brisbane Writers Festival. Proudly co-funded by Brisbane City Council’s Creative Sparks. 130pm-230pm @ BWF: Aud 2, The State Library of QLD. Remember – no two flights can ever be the same.

And later on you have the choice of Poetry in the Red Chamber featuring Hinemoana Baker, Bronwyn Lea, William Barton, John Bennett & Rosanna Licari. 6:30pm – 8:30pm, Old Parliament House, Red Chamber.

or

Heat 2 of the Australian Poetry Slam @ Brisbane Writers Festival (The Studio, State Library of QLD). Sign up 730pm / slam 8pm. MC Ghostboy with Tessa Leon + feature band The Stress of Leisure.

So get your poetry boots on and I’ll see you there!

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Brisbane Poetry Gig Guide – April 26

Well, I am home, fresh from a great gig today in Brisbane Square Library with Ghostboy, Skye Staniford, DarkWing Dubs and the mighty Sheish Money. Thanks to all who came along.

Here’s what’s happening around town over the next few weeks. Hope to see you somewhere soon…

 

Tuesday April 28
 
Riverbend Books – Poetry On the Deck 
 
Queensland Poetry Festival, QLD Writers Centre & Riverbend Books are proud to present the second Poetry on the Deck event for 2009. Join us on the Riverbend deck and enjoy the rural sounds of Longreach poet, Helen Avery (Seduced by Sky) alongside established local voices Rosanna Licari and Philip Neilsen (Without an Alibi) and emerging poet, Sophia Nugent-Siegal (Oracle).
 
Date: Tuesday 28 April
Location: Riverbend Books, 193 Oxford St. Bulimba
Time: Doors open for the event at 6pm for a 6:30pm start
Tickets: $10 available through Riverbend Books and include sushi and complimentary wine. To purchase tickets, call Riverbend Books on (07) 3899 8555 or book online at http://www.riverbendbooks.com.au/Events/EventDetails.aspx?ID=2199 
 
 
 
 
Saturday May 2
 
Bruce Dawe launches A Good Harvest (Post Pressed, 2009) by celebrated Queensland poet, Maureen Freer. The launch will feature readings of Maureen’s poetry by Ross Clark. Drinks and nibbles will also be served.
 
Where: In the Red Chamber, Parliament House
When: Saturday May 2, 2-4 pm.
All welcome. Free.

Maureen Freer is one of  this state’s best-known and loved poets. Indeed, as Bruce Dawe has said, ‘She is one of our most immediately accessible poets, and one who has established a firm reputation over many years’. She has received a number of awards including the Premier’s Poetry Prize 1987 and the Order of Australia for services to Australian literature, 1984. She was Chair/Convenor of the Brisbane Writers Festival from the early Warana days for fourteen years, and also chaired the 1982 Commonwealth Writers Week.

Maureen was the first person to organise a poetry reading in the Red Chamber — featuring Tom Shapcott, Bruce Dawe, David Rowbotham, John Blight and Rodney Hall. It’s appropriate, then, that what is probably her final collection of verse is launched there also.
 
 
 
Sunday May 3
 
SpeedPoets is back for Round 3 of 2009! Be there as Brisbane’s longest running spoken word/poetry event takes over The Alibi Room (720 Brunswick St. New Farm) on Sunday May 3 from 2:00pm – 5:00pm. The May event features the delicate beauty of Ichabod’s Crane: http://www.myspace.com/ichabodscranemusic. This Brisbane ensemble conjures the sounds of horses being ridden on sand and snake tails speeding beneath gumboots… music to be shipwrecked to! And to celebrate the pending launch of her debut collection ‘Voyage’, Zenobia Frost will perform a short feature set with a special appearance from Madrigal Maladies, her collaboration with Nerissa Rowan and if that’s not enough for you, winner of The Dream Ain’t Broken Chapbook Competition, Nicola Scholes will also perform a short feature set, showcasing poems from her forthcoming collection. As always there will also be live sounds from the SpeedPoets poetic riff generator Sheish Money, giveaways, free zines and two rounds of Open Mic. Entry is a gold coin… This is a gig not to be missed!
 
SpeedPoets, Sunday May 3 @ The Alibi Room, 720 Brunswick St. New Farm. 2:00pm – 5:00pm.
 
 
then get along to…
 
 
The launch of The Voyage, a poetry chapbook concerning the adventures of Zenobia Frost with illuminations by Bettina Walsh.
 
Time: 7:00pm
!Metro Arts Basement
109 Edward Street, Brisbane
Featuring [~support act James Sherlock~]
$5 entry / free drinks and nibblies
http://zenobiafrost.wordpress.com/
 
Presented by SweetWater Press
 
 
 
Saturday May 16
 
Words or Whatever – Performance poetry @ Blackstar Cafe 44 Thomas St West End from 6:30pm.

Featured acts this month include – Dissent of Didymus, Darkwing Dubs, Luke Townson + Special guests including some non english speaking poets.

As well as these awesome acts, we wil have our regular features including ‘Words of Honour’ (tribute pieces to great wordsmiths) &  ‘Words-worth’ – Live Poetry Auction.

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Desert(ed) Island Poems #8 – Rosanna Licari

Here is an Easter Long Weekend treat for you all…

Rosanna Licari is one of the four feature poets programmed at this month’s Poetry on the Deck event at Riverbend Books (see details below). Here she lets us in to the world of her Desert(ed) Island, showing us glimpses of the poetry that has guided her journey.

 

rosanna-licari1

 

When I was asked what ten poems I would take onto a desert(ed) island after some reflection the task seemed harder than I initially thought. Does a list of ten poems really encompass all my favourites? Do I choose contemporary poems or include some of the “golden oldies”? Do I get patriotic and choose only Australian poems? And all this deliberation before Good Friday!

I’m presenting a list that is by no means exhaustive and is not in any order of preference. I’ve selected the poems, firstly, for their level of writing mastery and, secondly, for their emotional impact. The poems are by Robert Lowell, Les Murray, Seamus Heaney, Anne Sexton, Sharon Olds, Bronwyn Lea, John Forbes, Sarah Holland-Batt, Anthony Lawrence and Gig Ryan.

 

1. Sailing Home from Rapallo by Robert Lowell

Lowell’s Life Studies was the first collection of poetry that really interested me. I was a working-class migrant girl who knew nothing about literature. The collection was introduced to me in high school and though I could probably say I had an immature comprehension because of my age and inexperience, what did attract me was the personal nature of the poems. Lowell wrote about his father, his mother, his grandparents, people that you could relate to, who were made of flesh and blood. He also wrote about a social class that was totally alien to me and this was intriguing. The title of this poem initially engaged me as one of my maternal aunts had lived in Rapallo. The first stanza stops you in your tracks:

 Your nurse could only speak Italian,
 but after twenty minutes I could imagine your final week,
 and tears ran down my cheeks….

Lowell is travelling with his mother’s coffin from the Gulf of Genoa, Italy back to America by ship and uses “spumante-bubbling” to describe the track of waves, “Risorgimento black and gold” to describe his mother’s casket. I’d never read anything like it. Then he changes scene to sub-zero weather conditions at the family cemetery in Dunbarton, New Hampshire:

 The graveyard’s soil was changing to stone –
 so many of its deaths had been midwinter.
 Dour and dark against the blinding snowdrifts,
 its black brook and fir trunks were as smooth as masts.
 A fence of iron spear-hafts
 black-bordered its mostly Colonial grave-slates.
 The only “unhistoric” soul to come here
 was Father, now buried beneath his recent
 unweathered pink-veined slice of marble.
     
 
His use of language, subject matter, and free verse was a revelation to me and probably was responsible for my partiality for confessional poetry.

Read the poem here: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/archive/poem.html?id=177954

 

2. The Bulahdelah-Taree Holiday Song Cycle by Les Murray

There is no doubt that Murray is a master. Not only is he prolific, he knows how to put the right word in the right place. This is a long, richly descriptive poem depicts people, their activities, their histories as well as the flora and fauna that surrounds them. It deals with the ordinary rituals of the holidays:

 Fresh sheets have been spread and tucked tight, childhood room have
  been seen to,

 For this is the season when children return with their children
 to the place of Bingham’s Ghost, of the Old Timber wharf. Of the
  Big Flood That time,
 The country of the rationalised farms. Of the day-and-night farms,
  and the Pitt street farms,
 of the Shire Engineer and many other rumours, of the tractor crankcase
  furred with chaff,
 the places of sitting down near ferns, the snake-fear places, the
  cattle-crossing-long-ago places.

There is considerable difficulty associated with writing a long poem in terms of sustaining interest and avoiding the repetition of an idea that does not contribute to the work as a whole. Murray manages this effortlessly in a very accessible and truly creative writing style. No wonder he has broad appeal.

Read the poem here: http://www.clivejames.com/poetry/murray/buladelah-taree

 

3. The Early Purges by Seamus Heaney

This poem is from Death of a Naturalist and is not recommended for vegetarians or RSPCA members. It is quite a confronting poem in which Heaney maintains a simple descriptive style. Heaney depicts the times he saw “pests” dealt with and highlights the contrast between city and country attitudes. At six, he first witnesses the drowning of kittens:

 Soft paws scraping like mad. But their tiny din
 Was soon soused. They were slung on the snout
 Of the pump and the water pumped in.

Heaney is a poet of high calibre who as a toddler must have uttered a limerick as his first verbal construction!

Read the poem here: http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/the-early-purges/

 

4. For My Lover, Returning to His Wife by Anne Sexton

Sexton’s Love Poems deals with the theme of adultery and female sexuality and this was something a female American poet just did not write about in the sixties. It was revolutionary for its time and I suggest that it is still very impressive several decades on. The title is self-explanatory and follows the telling-it-as-it-is style of Sexton. The female speaker unflinchingly compares herself to her lover’s steadfast wife:

 She has always been there, my darling.
 She is in fact, exquisite.
 Fireworks in the dull middle of February
 and as real as a cast-iron pot.

 Let’s face it, I have been momentary.
 A luxury…

Then the rejected woman farewells the married man she has had an affair with:

 I give you back your heart.
 I give you permission –

 for the fuse inside her, throbbing
 angrily in the dirt, for the bitch in her
 and the burying of her wound –
 for the burying of her small red wound alive – …

Every time I read this poem, it still stings.

Read the poem here: http://www.fort.org/sexton_for_my_lover.html

 
5. First by Sharon Olds

Sharon Olds is another American poet that has the knack of writing about taboo subjects in an intelligent manner. “First” is from her collection, The Wellspring. This is a poem about a new sexual experience she had had when she was a young woman. She proceeds to tell the reader in a very matter-of-fact manner about an incident at the sulphur baths with a writer on whom she performs fellatio:

  … I was a sophomore
 at college, in the baths with a naked man,
 a writer, married, a father, widowed,
 remarried, separated, unreadable, and when I
 said No, I was sorry, I couldn’t,
 he invented this, rising and dripping
 in the heavy sodium water, giving me
 his body to suck…

And then she agrees to participate:

 I gave over to flesh like church music
 until he drew himself out and held himself and
 something flew past me like a fresh ghost.

It is not sleazy or disgusting even though the naked writer she tells us about may well have been.

 

6. Born Again by Bronwyn Lea

The poem reflects the confessional style of some of my favourite American women poets and is not something that is often seen in Lea’s work. Lea is adept at interweaving religious references throughout the poem about her meeting with her former husband who has become a born-again Christian. He had gone to the desert to die but:

 Instead of dying, god spoke to him.
 God forgave all his trespasses. But I
 didn’t forgive his trespasses against me.
 My heart was a long ledger….

He goes to her house to collect their daughter and Lea makes him wait. When she returns he is gone but then she finds him:

    …I saw
 a figure kneeling by a large granite
 boulder. The ponderosa above him
 was weighted with snow. The knees
 of his jeans were wet. Snow drifts
 on his shoulders & back of his shoes.
 Snow collected on his upturned palms.

This poem is in your face, the cold hard facts.

 

7. Four Heads and How to do Them by John Forbes

A classic. A suite of four poems that deals with perception. Forbes describes the Classical Head as follows:

 Nature in her wisdom has formed the human head
 so it stands at the very top of the body.

 The head – or let us say the face – divides into 3,
 the seats of wisdom, beauty & goodness respectively.

Of course, there’s more. Then discover the Romantic Head, the Symbolist Head and the Conceptual Head. A very interesting read.

Read the poem here: http://australia.poetryinternationalweb.org/piw_cms/cms/cms_module/index.php?obj_id=12456&x=1

 

8. Shore Acres by Sarah Holland-Batt

From her recent collection, Aria, the poem is about the ending of a relationship and begins with an engaging description:

 August, driving from North Bend
 from Empire, we saw how the waves gut
 the bluffs until they are pocked, whole
 scoops of rock being pawed out by water.

However, things have changed:

 But this year nothing moves at Shore Acres;
 the water is static as land, and stripes
 of foam bone its slate like a corset.
 We are here for the end of movement.

It is easy to be impressed by Holland-Batt’s use of language and imagery.

 

9. Grim Periphery by Anthony Lawrence

Lawrence’s poem of chronic insomnia begins with:

 The narrative extends, seamless, from a cutting
 you brought back from some great divide in a coal
 town’s grim periphery, and you do nothing to stop it,
 you’re exhausted….

Exhausted from another night of sleeplessness, facing a morning that it “too bright and thick with domestic urgency”, showering and self-gratification doesn’t help. It continues. The birds are up and it’s 6 am, thoughts race and there’s no relief. Fitful sleep eventually comes –  but there is no peace.

This is not a nice, well-mannered poem. Lawrence takes you by the hand to a disturbed, visceral world. But don’t be fooled by the chaotic imagery, this is a well-crafted, well thought out poem.

 

10. If I Had a Gun by Gig Ryan

A woman’s view about what is wrong with men. Effective use of repetition and blunt descriptions. Try this on for size:

 I’d shoot the man who can’t look me in the eye
 who stares at my boobs when we’re talking
 who rips me off in the milk-bar and smiles his wet purple smile
 who comments on my clothes. I’m not a fucking painting
 that needs to be told what it looks like.

Or:

 I’d shoot the man last night who said Smile honey
 don’t look so glum with money swearing from his jacket
 and a 3-course meal he prods lazily
 who tells me his problems: his girlfriend, his mother,
 his wife, his daughter, his sister, his lover
 because women will listen to that sort of rubbish.

Ouch!

Guys, this is a poem women poets talk about when you aren’t around and perhaps, even a poem they wanted to write themselves. A definite insight into female perception of the opposite sex.

Read the poem here: http://www.austlit.com/a/ryan-gig/doa.html

 

     ۞

 

Finally, I include a poem of mine which I’ve been asked to share with you. “The last weeks of the war, Italy 1945” is published in Hecate, Vol. 34 No 2, 2008 and comes from the unpublished collection, An Absence of Saints. It is about my mother, Sofia, and depicts a period of time during WWII when she was taken by the Germans. It is set in Istria, Italy.

 

The last weeks of the war, Italy 1945      

 

1. Ičiči

The Germans tell her to get
into the jeep.
Holding on to its cold, dusty sides,
Sofia looks back at the steel-grey
Adriatic and her brother,
as it lurches onto the road.
Against his chest, he holds
the lunch she’s brought him
wrapped in a worn, cotton napkin.
Standing next to him, his girlfriend,
who has accompanied her there.
Sofia tightens her grip.
The Germans are taking
her to Fiume.

 

2. Fiume

The gaol door slams shut
as she looks at the toilet
in the corner and the old stone wall
facing her and the others,
all women. She is the youngest
in this group of forty. She fingers
the crucifix round her neck.

The cell smells
of human sweat and waste
but swallows swoop
into the courtyard
when the prisoners walk round
inside its walls once a day.

At midday after they soak
their bread with the remnants
of their watery soup,
the others stare at the serving
of pasta she gets in addition
because of her age.

For more food she lines up
with the adults to unpick rough,
burlap sacks in a musty room.
She’d hoped for meat, she gets
bread and jam.

 

3. Portorose

The guard takes her by the arm,
out of the cell, and onto a truck
to sit among German soldiers
with tortoise-like helmets and rifles.
Non parlano italiano and
she doesn’t speak German.

They arrive at a hotel that
smells of lilacs and roses.
Flanked by two soldiers she pauses
in the lobby  when she sees
the French windows and the honey-
coloured, parquet floor.

Sofia shares a velvet-draped room
with three other girls, and sees
the jade Adriatic from a small,
narrow balcony. No one talks.
Anyone could be a spy.
She dreams of her mother’s garden
in Valsantamarina.

She’s become a mula del FlaK
wears a blue uniform, goes to daily
lessons to learn German – Ich habe Angst
morse code –  dit dit dit dah dah dah dit dit dit
and to study the highways
of the air.

 

4. Pirano

She gets off the tram and something
makes her keep walking to the water’s edge.
This time she isn’t getting the tram
back to Portorose.

A shoemaker with a limp asks her
where she is going, she tells him
she wants to get back to Fiume.

He points to his house in the lane.
She walks in that direction after he leaves
but then she hides and waits.

Hai visito la mula del FlaK? 
He asks his wife when he returns.
There are no Germans.
Sofia comes out from her spot
under some stairs.

They’ll get her to a safe house.

 

5. Croc

Part of the letter to her mother reads
non sono coi tedeschi, sono in una casa and
the woman slips it into her shirt pocket
and promises to deliver it.

A few days later, some dirty, young men rush
past her and into the cottage with news −
the Americans have liberated Trieste.

 

6. Abbazia

Sofia stands at the aquamarine
shore and can’t remember
how many trucks it took
to get from Croc
to Buje
to Trieste
to Fiume
to Abbazia,

or how much
bread and water
she had,

or how many
people she met
as she passed rasping vehicles
filled with partisans
or prisoners of war.

She knows
if she’s lucky
she only needs
one more ride.

 

NOTES:

The last weeks of the war, Italy 1945
1. Non parlano italiano  – They don’t speak Italian.
2.Ich habe Angst (German) – I am afraid.
3. La mula del FlaK (Italian dialect) – A girl of the German anti-aircraft unit.
4. dit dit dit dah dah dah dit dit dit – morse code for SOS.
5. Hai visito la mula del FlaK?   Have you seen the girl of the German anti-aircraft unit.
6. Non sono coi tedeschi sono in una casa (Italian) – I’m not with the Germans, I’m in a house.
7. Croc – a place in Istria, Italy. My mother isn’t clear where it was but remembers the name as such. It may even have been code for the location.

 

Queensland Poetry Festival, QLD Writers Centre & Riverbend Books are proud to present the second Poetry on the Deck event for 2009. Join Rosanna Licari on the Riverbend deck alongside Longreach poet, Helen Avery (Seduced by Sky), Philip Neilsen (Without an Alibi) and emerging poet, Sophia Nugent-Siegal (Oracle).
 
Date: Tuesday 28 April
Location: Riverbend Books, 193 Oxford St. Bulimba
Time: Doors open for the event at 6pm for a 6:30pm start
Tickets: $10 available through Riverbend Books and include sushi and complimentary wine. To purchase tickets, call Riverbend Books on (07) 3899 8555 or book online at http://www.riverbendbooks.com.au/Events/EventDetails.aspx?ID=2199
 
The first event for the year was a huge success, with tickets selling out quickly, so book early to avoid disappointment!

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Brisbane Poetry Gig Guide: April 9

Friday April 17
 
Contraverse launches into 2009 at The Book Nook, Boundary St. West End from 7pm with Round Robin Open Mic and a feature set from Miss Ruby Fizz herself, Zenobia Frost. Entry is free.
 
 
 
Saturday April 18
 
Words or Whatever is Brisbane’s newest gig. All the Spoken Word, Slam, Hip-Hop and Subversion takes place from 6:30pm at Black Star Cafe, 44 Thomas Street, West End. The April gig features performances by LESSONMC, SURREAL, MANTIST, TRIKS & CHARLIE CHOCOLATE. Get along and check it out!
 
 
 
Sunday April 26
 
Acoustics on Sunday

Sunday 26th April, 12 noon – 2:15pm in the Sound and Vision Lounge, Level One Brisbane Square Library. The live sounds keep coming! Some of Brisbane’s finest singer songwriters will be performing in the library on the last Sunday of each month and for the month of April, don’t miss the original sounds of:
 
GHOSTBOY & FRIENDS

Join local performance artist & surrealist spoken word ringmaster Ghostboy as he directs a stripped down eye into the void with his muse & sister singer-songwriter Skye Staniford (Golden Virtues/ We All  Want To). And to round it all off square, he will also present two of  his underground f(r)iends in local sci-fi hip hop genre bender Darkwing Dubs as well as Graham Nunn & Sheish Money – poetry’s answer to the ocean call.

Acoustics on Sunday @ Brisbane Square Library, April 26, 12:00pm – 2:15pm featuring Darkwing Dubs, Ghostboy & Skye Staniford + Graham Nunn & Sheish Money. Entry is Free!

 

Sunday April 26 
 
Ahimsa House proudly supports the local community-based poetry group in West End—The Kurilpa Poets. The next gig is Sunday, 26th April 2009. Time: 02—04.30 PM at – The Emma Goldman Room – at Ahimsa House, 26 Horan Street West End (opposite the West End State School). 
 
Our feature poet for April is Brent Downes. Brent is a dynamic, innovative, gifted and talented poet, writer, artist and performer from Brisbane. Brent can be found loitering with creative intent at most of Brisbane’s spoken-word events. He is the new MC and host of the long running, avant-garde West End poetry group, Contraverse.
 
In November 2008 he launched his first book of poetry Coat of Arms. This first, seminal book decisively probes modern, urban, romantic, lyrical, expressive, and conversational themes. His poetry fearlessly explores subjects you may or may not hear in a confessional! Hypnotic, cryptic off rhymes, off beat suburban lines, music for the end times, whispered declarations of post-coital love, yelled portents of sex and apocalypse, the last taste of wine on your lips—all pepper his provocative and enigmatic verse. Don’t miss a stellar performance from one of the young lions of the Brisbane poetry scene!
 
For more information please phone Vij Chandra on 0411 033181, or e-mail a message to kurilpapoets@yahoo.com.au
 
 
 
Tuesday April 28
 
Poetry on the Deck
 
Queensland Poetry Festival, QLD Writers Centre & Riverbend Books are proud to present the second Poetry on the Deck event for 2009. Join us on the Riverbend deck and enjoy the rural sounds of Longreach poet, Helen Avery (Seduced by Sky) alongside established local voices Rosanna Licari and Philip Neilsen (Without an Alibi) and emerging poet, Sophia Nugent-Siegal (Oracle).
 
Date: Tuesday 28 April
Location: Riverbend Books, 193 Oxford St. Bulimba
Time: Doors open for the event at 6pm for a 6:30pm start
Tickets: $10 available through Riverbend Books and include sushi and complimentary wine. To purchase tickets, call Riverbend Books on (07) 3899 8555 or book online at http://www.riverbendbooks.com.au/Events/EventDetails.aspx?ID=2199
 
The first event for the year was a huge success, with tickets selling out quickly, so book early to avoid disappointment!
 
 

Saturday May 2
 
Bruce Dawe launches A Good Harvest (Post Pressed, 2009) by celebrated Queensland poet, Maureen Freer. The launch will feature readings of Maureen’s poetry by Ross Clark. Drinks and nibbles will also be served.
 
Where: In the Red Chamber, Parliament House
When: Saturday May 2, 2-4 pm.
All welcome. Free.

Maureen Freer is one of  this state’s best-known and loved poets. Indeed, as Bruce Dawe has said, ‘She is one of our most immediately accessible poets, and one who has established a firm reputation over many years’. She has received a number of awards including the Premier’s Poetry Prize 1987 and the Order of Australia for services to Australian literature, 1984. She was Chair/Convenor of the Brisbane Writers Festival from the early Warana days for fourteen years, and also chaired the 1982 Commonwealth Writers Week.

Maureen was the first person to organise a poetry reading in the Red Chamber — featuring Tom Shapcott, Bruce Dawe, David Rowbotham, John Blight and Rodney Hall. It’s appropriate, then, that what is probably her final collection of verse is launched there also.

 

Sunday May 3

SpeedPoets is back for Round 3 of 2009! Be there as Brisbane’s longest running spoken word/poetry event takes over The Alibi Room (720 Brunswick St. New Farm) on Sunday May 3 from 2:00pm – 5:00pm. The May event features the delicate beauty of Ichabod’s Crane: http://www.myspace.com/ichabodscranemusic. This Brisbane ensemble conjures the sounds of horses being ridden on sand and snake tails speeding beneath gumboots… music to be shipwrecked to! There will also be live sounds from the SpeedPoets poetic riff generator Sheish Money, giveaways, free zines and two rounds of Open Mic. Entry is a gold coin… See you there!

SpeedPoets, Sunday May 3 @ The Alibi Room, 720 Brunswick St. New Farm. 2:00pm – 5:00pm.

 

then get along to…

 

The launch of The Voyage, a poetry chapbook concerning the adventures of Zenobia Frost with illuminations by Bettina Walsh.

Time: 7:00pm
!Metro Arts Basement
109 Edward Street, Brisbane
Featuring [~support act TBA~]
$5 entry / free drinks and nibblies
http://zenobiafrost.wordpress.com/

Presented by SweetWater Press

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Queensland Poetry Festival Presents: Poetry on the Deck #2, Tuesday April 28

Queensland Poetry Festival, QLD Writers Centre & Riverbend Books are proud to present the second Poetry on the Deck event for 2009. Join us on the Riverbend deck and enjoy the rural sounds of Longreach poet, Helen Avery (Seduced by Sky) alongside established local voices Rosanna Licari and Philip Neilsen (Without an Alibi) and emerging poet, Sophia Nugent-Siegal (Oracle).

Date: Tuesday 28 April
Location: Riverbend Books, 193 Oxford St. Bulimba
Time: Doors open for the event at 6pm for a 6:30pm start
Tickets: $10 available through Riverbend Books and include sushi and complimentary wine.

To purchase tickets, call Riverbend Books on (07) 3899 8555 or book online at: http://www.riverbendbooks.com.au/Events/EventDetails.aspx?ID=2199

The first event for the year was a huge success, with tickets selling out quickly, so book early to avoid disappointment!

About the Poets:

rosanna-licari

Rosanna Licari is a poet and founding editor and publisher of Stylus Poetry Journal. In 2008, she was a runner up for the Thomas Shapcott Prize. She teaches English to migrant and refugees in Brisbane and is currently completing a M.Ph .(Creative Writing) at the University of Queensland.

 

philip-neilsen1

Philip Neilsen is a Brisbane poet and author who has written eleven books and edited four. His first poetry collection earned him a Writers Fellowship from the Australia Council and his fifth and most recent, Without an Alibi (Cambridge: Salt, 2008) was praised in Australian Book Review.  His poetry was included in the Norton anthology The Making of a Sonnet in 2008 and The Penguin Anthology of Australian Poetry in 2009. He is Professor of Creative Writing at QUT.

 

sophie-nugent

Sophia Nugent-Siegal is a young poet whose interest in mythology, art and history is woven into work with a contemporary focus and edge. Sophia has won many national young writers’ awards (she is a 3-time national award winner in the Taronga Foundation Poetry Prize, and has also won the FAW Young Poet of the Year and Mavis Thorpe Clark awards). Her first book, Oracle (published by PostPressed), provides a fresh, sharp and contemporary insight into the continuing resonance of the Classical world.  Recent projects include a collection based on illuminated manuscripts of medieval texts from an exhibition at the Melbourne State Library in 2008.

 

helen-avery

Sheep farmer, cow cocky, wife, mother, middle aged redundant … Helen Avery is beginning to write “Poet” when asked for details of occupation. Human life dominated by landscape and weather – distil that into words?  I try!

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Jumping the Poetic Hurdle (part 8): the question of journals

I was reading through the comments posted in response to the recent interview I did with Rosanna Licari, editor of Stylus Poetry Journal and came across this article posted by Amanda Joy:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booknews/4863351/Internet-is-causing-poetry-boom.html

And this probing gem of a question from Paul Squires:

There are lots of excellent journals on line these days. They are very easy and cheap to create, in fact anyone can do it. Get a URL and a nice template, invite your friends to submit and throw links. It’s a great democratisation of the role of the editor. Given that the career path of the poet is not what it was, I am wondering where the value of appearing in journals is for the poet?

This is a question that demanded to be part of the Jumping the Poetic Hurdle discussion. I encourage you all to be part of the dialogue.

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