Tag Archives: Raymond Carver

LitRock Songs

Issa’s Untidy Hut has long been one of my favourite blogs, serving up some of the finest ‘little’ poems from the Lilliput Review, poetic explorations into the lives and art of poets and of course Issa’s Sunday Service. The Sunday Service features a song which bridges the gap between rock and literature in some fashion… it may be a reference, it may be the artist themselves or it may be that the words demand closer attention. However it happens, we all know music and literature are not as far removed as some would like to think.  And now, Issa’s Sunday Service has put the call out for submissions of your favourite LitRock Songs and to make it even sweeter, if yours is selected, you receive the two current issues of The Lilliput Review.

Now as you know, I am a huge believer in Ezra Pound’s famous words:

poetry begins to atrophy when it gets too far from music

so here’s a few of my LitRock recommendations for you to dip into…

And please, drop your suggestions to me as a comment, I am always up for some listening and don’t forget to email them to the Lilliput Review for consideration (be sure to check out the first 27 tracks before emailing).

 

lloyd cole#3

Are You Ready To Be Heartbroken? – Lloyd Cole & the Commotions

When it comes to Lloyd Cole, there are a number of tracks I could have selected – Rattlesnakes for it’s Simone de Beuvior reference; Perfect Skin for its lyric, Louise is the girl with the perfect skin/ she says turn on the light, otherwise it can’t be seen/ she’s got cheekbones like geometry and eyes like sin/ and she’s sexually enlightened by cosmopolitan; Weird On Me for using a line from Raymond Carver – but I have gone for the lesser known Are You Ready To Be Heartbroken? Originally recorded as part of the Rattlesnakes sessions, I chose this song for it’s wonderful Norman Mailer reference and all round lyricism. And with Lloyd playing Brisbane’s Powerhouse tonight, his words have been circling my brain. Be sure to watch the clip above…

Here’s a snapshot of the lyrics:

Pumped up full of vitamins
On account of all the seriousness
You say you’re so happy now
you can hardly stand
Lean over on the bookcase
If you really want to get straight
Read Norman Mailer
Or get a new tailor

Are you ready to be heartbroken?

(read the complete lyrics here)

 

 

Springsteen

It’s Hard to be a Saint in the City – Bruce Springsteen & The E-Street Band

Let’s face it, any song from Springsteen’s first few albums could be included and then there are the tracks from Nebraska & his much overlooked album The Ghost of Tom Joad. The man has penned some of the greatest lyrics of his era. And before I go further into the lyrics of Saint in the City, if you don’t get goosebumps watching this live clip of a young, hungry E-Street Band, tearing up The Hammersmith Odeon on their first tour of Britain, then you need to check your pulse. The way Bruce conducts the whole band here is intense and the guitar duel between he and Little Stevie is white hot. But back to why I chose It’s Hard to be  Saint in the City. Well, it’s purely on the lyric. Springsteen’s early work had that wild, sprawling, carnival feel… all shifting perspectives, haunted visions, streetwise toughness & heady romanticism. Saint is a classic and for mine makes the list every time.

Check out these lyrics:

And the sages of the subway sit just like the living dead
As the tracks clack out the rhythm their eyes fixed straight ahead
They ride the line of balance and hold on by just a thread
But it’s too hot in these tunnels you can get hit up by the heat
You get up to get out at your next stop but they push you back down in your seat
Your heart starts beatin’ faster as you struggle to your feet
Then you’re outa that hole and back up on the street

And them South Side sisters sure look pretty
The cripple on the corner cries out “Nickels for your pity”
And them downtown boys sure talk gritty
It’s so hard to be a saint in the city

(read the complete lyrics here)

 

 

Steve Kilbey

Swan Lake – The Church

Steve Kilbey, like Leonard Cohen, Patti Smith, Bob Dylan et al. is a poet in his own right. Having released three books – Earthed, Nineveh/The Ephemeron & Fruit Machine – plus the broadsheet, Eden alongside more than 20 albums with The Church (not to mention the myriad other side and solo projects), Kilbey has more than proved his literary credentials. 1992’s Priest=Aura album was a turning point in my own personal history. The albums dense textures and sublime lyricism turned me inside out and set me off in search of poetry. I could have chosen any one of the songs from this album but for now, I will settle with the fragile beauty of Swan Lake.

One night your shoulders will ache
But next day when you wake
You’ll sprout wild wings, and fly high
Just like in Swan Lake

(complete lyrics here)

And for everyone in Australia, don’t forget the band is touring nationally throughout November. Full tour dates are listed on the band’s website.

 

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Strange Conversations

I was flipping through some old mags and journals tonight and came across an issue of University of QLD journal, Vanguard. Inside the issue was a series of ‘conversations’ between some of the greats of twentieth century literature – Raymond Carver, Allen Ginsberg, e.e. cummings and Jack Kerouac – and a number of local Brisbane poets. The editors had pitched us a series of questions from the works of these literary giants and encouraged us to go nuts. The results… some frenetic, curious and strange conversations.

Here’s a sample from each interview… and if you want to add your own response to one of the questions, feel free drop it in the comments.

 

Interviewer: e.e. cummings, from 100 Selected Poems

Interviewees: Jef Caruss (JC) and Sheish Money (SM)

e. e.:  shall the voice of liberty be mute?

JC: If I can’t yell the occasional obscenity, then I cannot be free.

e. e.:  I say to you who are silent.—“Do you see Life?”

SM: I say to you who are dead do you hear noise?

e. e.:  what if a dawn of a doom of a dream bites this universe in two, peels forever out of his grave and sprinkles nowhere with me and you?

SM: Then the twilight of a beginning being will forge a pact with grave and gifted and float nothingness on air till you and I return.

 

Interviewer: Raymond Carver (RC), from All of Us: The Collected Poems

Interviewee: Graham Nunn (GN)

RC:  What the hell is going on?

GN: In a soft skinned sunset, the hot breath of prayer is sketching new purpose; bleeding silver sutures to stitch up the remnants of something far more interesting, for we are gone sweetness…wired, split, shot to elsewhere.

RC: What’s wrong?

GN: All the trees are dressed in flames, houses stumble forward menacingly, foaming at the windows and the road has torn itself free from underfoot. Our heads are filled with avalanches and our mouths with waterfalls.

RC: Have you had any fresh lemonade lately?

GN: I have written english nouns without capitals, bared my teeth at the tatting of tongues, watched a thunderstorm in my cupboard, philandered over elegant chairs and drank myself silly thank you very much!

 

Interviewer: Jack Kerouac (JK), from Old Angel Midnight

Interviewee: Rowan Donovan (RD)

JK: How are you Mrs Jones?

RD: Since the operation? Good! And since my marriage to Mr. Jones? Even better! It’s amazing what these doctors can do today. A little nip here. A little tuck there and—Hey Presto—just me and my new private parts. Actually, it was the wedding and all the fuss that was trying but now I’m good, and thank you for asking, Mr. Kerouac. Mind if I call you Jack?

JK: Why read Don Quixote when you can read The Diamond Sutra or the Wonderful Law Lotus Sutra?

RD: That’s right! Why read a classic of Western Literature when you can read the sutra that first enlightened Hui Neng?

JK: Do I dream?

RD: Not if you have read The Diamond Sutra.

JK: What kinda world we’d have (Hi Missus Twazz) (O jullo Mr. Moon mock) a world all poits?

RD: Ahh, Jack. I love it when you talk dirty.

 

Interviewer: Allen Ginsberg (AG), from Planet News:

Interviewee: Julie Beveridge (JB)
 

AG: The colour of the wind?

JB: The wind had no colour til I quit smoking and now it looks like all the cigarette smoke I no longer inhale, it just follows me around asking me why I don’t drop by anymore.

AG: Do you want to live or die?

JB: I don’t know whether to kill myself or go bowling.

AG: Well, who knows?

JB: The guy at the bowling alley said to kill myself. He’d know I guess.

AG: How big is the prick of the President?

JB: Not as big as mine… but bigger than yours.

AG: You’re in a bad mood?

JB: Don’t get upset, your prick is a fine size. There’s no need to get personal.

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