Tag Archives: open mic

SpeedPoets: last drinks for 2009

If you are anywhere near Brisbane this coming Sunday (November 1), and you like your poetry live, then head along to SpeedPoets. This Sunday brings the curtain down on the events eighth year and there is no plan of slowing down… SpeedPoets will take a break over summer and return in March 2010, well rested and hungry for your words.

SpeedPoets Gimp

To take us out for the year, there will be features from Jeremy Thompson & Brent Downes, live music and sounds from Sheish Money, free zines, giveaways and a surprise performance by one of the acts that had the audience raving after QPF’s Saturday night event A Million Bright Things. And of course there is you, giving voice to your poem in the Open Section and keeping the event vibrant, diverse and full of fire.

So pack your poems and be part of the celebration this Sunday, November 1 from 2pm at The Alibi Room, 720 Brunswick St, New Farm.

I’ll see you there…

 

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SpeedPoets & other Brisbane Poetry Gigs

SpeedPoets Logo

 

Don’t forget that SpeedPoets takes over The Alibi Room tomorrow for their annual Open Mic Championships… should be a great afternoon. Check out all the details tomorrow as well as lots of other upcoming gigs.

Sunday August 2
 
This is the big one folks! SpeedPoets fires up for its yearly Open Mic Championships, so make sure you are at The Alibi Room (720 Brunswick St, New Farm) from 2pm to put your name down to be in the running for some cool prizes including $100 first place, $50 second place + a whole range of giveaways. But most importantly, we want you there to share the spoken word love.
 
The rules of engagement are simple:
 
* There are 20 places available in the Open Mic Championships
* Sign on will take place at The Alibi Room between 2:00pm – 2:30pm or until the 20 places are filled
* Each poem read/performed must be the poet’s original work
* Each poet has 3 minutes to read/perform their poem (one poem only)
* If the poet goes over the allocated time, they will be notified and given 30sec to finish their poem.
* The poet may not use props or musical accompaniment.
* 5 poets will be selected to read in a second round
* Poets selected for the second round will be allocated 6 minutes to read two (2) poems
* If the poet goes over the allocated time, they will be notified and given 30sec to finish their poem.
* Judges will then select a first and second place (with prizes for the runners up)
 
Please note: these rules may be changed at the organisers discretion and judges decision is final. No discussion will be entered into.
 
And to add to the fun, our monthly riff generator, Sheish Money will be bringing some friends from his band Namedropper along to play a set of songs from their forthcoming CD.
 
As always there will be free zines and the monthly raffle. Entry is a gold coin donation. Don’t miss it!!!
 
SpeedPoets, 2pm Sunday August 2, The Alibi Room (720 Brunswick St New Farm)
 
 
 
Thursday August 6
 
Put some poems in your pocket and head on over to Cafe Checoco (Hardgrave Rd West End) for Poetry Soup. Plenty of Open Mic and jamming opportunities for all comers! The gig kicks off at 7:30pm and is a free event.
 
 
Wednesday August 19
 
THE SUITS SLAM OFF

ouTsideRs cordially invite you to THE SUITS

+ the AUSTRALIAN POETRY SLAM – BRISBANE HEAT 1

 ‘One of the most bizarre and brilliant live music events Brisbane is likely to witness this year.’ ouTsideRs Time Off review 

‘An idea that is not dangerous is not worthy of being called an idea at all.’ Oscar Wilde 

Following on from blowing Hunter’s Ghost at The Globe, Beau Brummel’s beckoning you to get your best suit on (bathing/business/birth/track, what have you) and get ready to kiss buttons as we present our second MASSIVE ouTsideRs show of 2009, stuffing David Byrne shoulder pads and Poetry Slam into the Ladies’ Lounge that is The Troubadour. Funded by the fine croupiers’ pockets via the Gambling Casino Benefit Fund, this night will be a three-piece American box cut with the best BrisVegas wordsmiths venting their hearts and words on lapels for all to wear and hear! 

Featuring track-suited drop six house band & their John Butler award winning hip-hop soul Impossible Odds,  the contemporary double breasted chicanery of MAJIK BOX and QLD slam spoken weird suit-master of ceremonies Ghostboy with well groomed word mannequins  Tessa Leon & Pascalle Burton….plus the usual ouTsideRs dandy madness! 

And this show sees the start of the Australian Poetry Slam presented by The State Library of QLD –  in true two-tone style, tailored lines and all. Two minutes to “hit The Troubadour mike and let the words take flight” as part of Australia’s biggest spoken word competition – where the audience is the judge! It’s a Rat Race, the first 20 to sign up on the night will compete. For full event & slam details head to: www.slq.qld.gov.au/poetryslam

ouTsideRs/Australian Poetry Slam Heat 1
The Troubadour
Wed 19th August
8pm doors / 8:30pm start
$5 entry / prizes for best use of a tie… Suits you, Sir, oooh!
www.outsiders.com.au

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Speak Out: Poetry and the Spoken Word (part 2) an interview with Tim Sinclair

A couple of weeks ago, this Lost Shark asked the question:

So why is it that few poems published in literary journals would find an audience in the world of, performance-driven spoken word? In turn, why is it that the majority of pieces performed on open-mic/Slam stages would be ignored by established literary journals?

Is there a line that separates spoken word from poetry?

Hinemoana Baker’s response fascinated and enlightened, so let’s see what Tim Sinclair has got to say on the matter.

 

tim-sinclair1


Green Eggs and Ham, Motherf**ker

As kids, before teachers started trying to teach us poetry they entrhalled us with Dr Seuss. Performance poetry? Page poetry? We didn’t know, we didn’t care. It sank straight in, and connected with our brains’ natural poetry receptors. Jump a few years forward, and you’ve suddenly got teachers teaching us poetry. It sucked. Sucked the life out of us. Drained the magic off the page.

I generalise, but my introduction to Capital ‘P’ page poetry was as a dull, ossified, arcane branch of literary AllBran – high in the daily allowance of moral fibre and guaranteed to well and truly give you the shits. Like a lot of my contemporaries (and like the people ten years either side of me, I’ve come to realise), I retreated to rock and hip hop, where the end rhymes satisfied my starving poetry receptors, and the need to find something cooler than school was satisfied. The transition from Dr Seuss to Dr Dre was made, and from that gateway drug it was a short and slippery slide into performance poetry.

It’s the cool factor that’s driven the wedge through Poetry, and both sides have exploited it to further their cause. But I’m not looking at the dividing line here, I’m exploring the contiuum. I’ve always been interested in the big grey area in the middle of things. Grey is where the colour happens.

I ‘came of age’ in the Adelaide poetry scene in the ‘90s, and I’m glad that’s where it happened. The scene was diverse (still is, by all accounts), and one of the absolute strengths of a place the size of Adelaide is the fact that there’s just no room for cliques. Or more realistically, there’s just no room for those cliques to be exclusive. To be part of a scene in a small town is to be constantly rubbing shoulders with the other cliques, and rubbing up close is where cross-pollination occurs.

At the time, I was still working out where all the bits fit, but even I could see that there was something different about the girl with a scream and a saxophone, and the guy who seeemed to feel that making eye contact with the audience would cheapen the poetry he was mumbling. The quiet ones annoyed me, when I could hear that their words were good. I couldn’t work out why they wouldn’t say them like they were important. The loud ones annoyed me too, when I could hear their words but really wished I couldn’t…

Presentation may in fact be the single most important signifier of genre, as shallow and simplistic as that sounds. Here is my cover, say the poets. Judge me. We all do it. We all know it’s done. The smart people exploit it. I know it’s kinda po-mo and relativist of me, but I think that this is what it all comes down to. Performance poetry is in the eye/ear/face of the beholder, and page poetry sits quietly, waiting to discover you.

But the stuff in the middle is the elusive gold, and the stuff in the middle is what bothers people. It’s the reason for all this ‘Page Vs Stage’ carry on. I like to use the lyrics/poetry parallel. I love what you can do with song lyrics. I love that Kurt Cobain can scream, and that scream is not inarticulate – saying more than half a book of poetry. It ain’t poetry though. And set all the poetry you like to music, it’s still poetry set to music. But there are those people in the middle. Laurie Anderson, perhaps. Nick Cave, perhaps. Leonard Cohen, perhaps. It’s all going to depend on your point of view, of course, and that’s about as close as I’m going to get towards a definitive answer here. People do ‘cross over’, and as long as they’re smart about rebranding themselves, the audience can take it. Audience likes to know what it’s getting, that’s all. Audience is simple like that. I ought to know – most of the time, I’m in it.

And as for those people who have to have borders, who have to shove the poets into one of two boxes? I do not like them, Sam-I-Am…

WHO AM TIM?

Tim was…
born in 1972.

Tim has…
lived most of his life in the Adelaide Hills, Australia watching semi-rural give way to suburban in a sad and inevitable way. 

also lived in Japan, Scotland, Malaysia, and the USA. And the Blue Mountains of NSW, and now Sydney. 

gone to school, gone to uni, got himself some pieces of paper. Answered phones, built sets, sold things, read words, written words, cut down (feral) trees, pumped petrol, planted trees, painted roofs and taught ESL in order to pay the rent.

friends who have put his words on CD, made his words into arty films, put his words on stage, put his words online.

strangers who have published his words, broadcast his words, listened to his words in cafes and pubs. Given him money to write more of them.

Tim is…
not sure that he agrees with Fernando Pessoa when he writes “Every spoken word double-crosses us”. But knows where he’s coming from, some days.

 

Find out more:

www.timsinclair.org
http://poetryandpoeticscentre.com/index.php/Interview_with_Tim_Sinclair

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