Tag Archives: Graham Nunn music reviews

The New Folk XV – Winter Sounds

This Lost Shark is moving slowly today… winter sun, lapping between my shoulder blades and the gentlest of breezes prickling my neck. Sunday’s don’t come much better, and today’s soundtrack comes courtesy of two fine Australian bands and one from the windy city of Chicago. Lose your self in these sounds… let your day find its own pace.

E-Song – Nikko

Brisbane band, Nikko have just released their much anticipated debut, The Warm Side. It is a brooding, densely crafted song cycle that seeps further into your consciousness with each listen. The band swings moodily across the nine songs, creating sonic peaks and troughs for singer/guitarist Ryan Potter to climb in and out of with his sparse lyricism. The Warm Side is a mature, intelligent debut, one that combines tension and tenderness, and leaves you with a feeling of discovery. While E-Song is not from the debut, I couldn’t resist posting this collaboration – Killing Time – with filmmaker Oliver Lofgren.

II – Fabulous Diamonds

Reverberated percussion, dubby-synths, isolated vocals, ghostly saxophone, this is the sonic terrain inhabited by Melbourne duo, Fabulous Diamonds. Their recent release II, is nothing short of hypnotic, blending extended, repetitive jams with shorter, surreal pop songs. This clip captures Fabulous Diamonds onstage creating a mesmerising soundscape that takes the boundary of pop music and unrelentingly stretches it.

Red Ants – Sonoi

Hailing from Chicago, sonoi are another band that are challenging the pop stereotype, with their warmly composed instrumentals, ambient collages and off-kilter rock. Red Ants opens their debut album and is one of the tracks that comes close to combining all of their styles. It is dreamlike in its construction, the melodic guitar line, floating keys and pulsing drum rhythms providing the perfect bed for Adam Busch’s heady vocals. Other highlights on the album are the perfectly crafted angular rock of Sherry Fall and the ambitious and album changing Anchor Tattoo.

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Darkness in the Light: Willy Vlautin live in Brisbane

Well yesterday was incredibly special… waking to a low grey sky, was the perfect start to a day that would only get better. It was the perfect weather for listening to Willy Vlautin.

Willy has been a big influence on me as an artist in the last decade. For me, the spareness of his writing, resonates in that space between the heart and the pit of the stomach. That space where darkness and light meet, to create an ache that just keeps itching at you, driving you to look deeper inside yourself, your world and the people in it. So with that big grey sky threatening to burst, we pulled on our jackets and headed in to Avid Reader to hear Willy read from his latest novel, Lean On Pete.

As part of the afternoon Salon, there were three other readers programmed from local university creative writing courses. Willy sat in the front row, sipping from his coffee watching intently the three writers who came before him, leaning in to their stories. And when it was his turn to take the mic, he thanked the authors and talked about his love for the independent bookstore. This wasn’t the prerequisite, ‘thank you for having me…’ this was straight from the heart, honest thanks. This humbling sense of honesty, was one of the outstanding features of Vlautin’s reading. There was no rock star ego, just a man and the sweet desperation of his words… words that he has obviously worked and lived hard for.

Vlautin lights up when he is reading and talking about his novels. His love for writing stories is clearly a driving force in his life. When asked the difference between writing stories and songs, Willy smiled and said, if you see me walking down the street smiling, then I’m probably writing stories, if you see me hungover, missing a tooth, then I’m probably writing songs. Vlautin admits to being a ‘bit of a sad sack’, and while there is a darkness in the characters (such as young Charley Thompson in Lean On Pete) he so skillfully brings to life, there is an intrinsic hope in his narratives, and it is this hope that lies in wait for the reader/listener willing to take the journey with Vlautin and his band of misfits.

At the end of the session, Willy signs books and is eager to engage in conversation with everyone in the queue. He doesn’t quite look comfortable behind the table and is on his feet to shake hands often and thank people for coming along to the reading. I get my books signed and talk to Willy about characters such as Walter from his Postcard Series on Richmond Fontaine’s 2003 album Post to Wire and Allison Johnson from his second novel Northline. We talk about these characters like they are old friends and Willy talks of their futures with clarity, he knows clearly what has happened to all these folk. We walk out into an evening that has cleared, our heads full of hope, ready to see Willy shift gears into singer/songwriter mode alongside Richmond Fontaine bandmate, Dan Eccles.

The Troubadour is nicely crowded tonight for a bill which also features local youngsters The Honey Month and Brisbane stalwarts Gentle Ben and His Sensitive Side.

Willy is again in the crowd for both bands and is clearly a big fan of Gentle Ben. Australian music has been a big influence on Vlautin, as it was the Paul Kelly song So Much Water So Close To Home (based on a Raymond Carver story of the same name) that inspired Vlautin to start writing prose.

When it is Willy and Dan’s turn to take the stage, they open with Welhorn Yards from The Fitzgerald. Like so many of Vlautin’s songs, it leaves you at the point of crisis to ponder the fates of his characters:

I saw the yobs and D.O.A but I couldn’t go home
So I went down to the yards and I sat by the concrete wall
And the wind picked up and I fell asleep on the dirt and gravel
At the Welhorn Yards
Harry shook me awake as the wind howled above us and
it nearly scared me to death
From a distant street light I saw the cut on his face and his
blood soaked shirt
“Everything went wrong,” he cried. “I lost the money and I think
J.P is gone. He was just laying on the floor when I ran for the door.”
At the Welhorn Yards, that night at the Welhorn Yards
Harry smoked cigarettes as the wind flurried above us
I gave him all the money i had and i gave him my ID and coat and
watched him disappear down the road
I sat back down and fell into the uneasiest of sleeps
the worst nightmares of sleeps
Where a madman came after me
His hair was on fire and his eyes were bleeding
and he said he was going to kill me

From there on in, the setlist is any Richmond Fontaine fans dream, featuring songs from their back catalogue such as:

Whiteline Fever (from Safety, 1997)
Out of State & Western Skyline (from Winnemucca, 2002)
Barely Losing, Two Broken Hearts, Post to Wire & Always on the Ride (from Post to Wire, 2003)
Incident at Conklin Creek (from The Fitzgerald, 2005)
$87 and a Guilty Conscience That Gets Worse the Longer I Go, I Fell Into Painting Houses in Phoenix Arizona, Moving Back Home, Lost in this World & Capsized (from Thirteen Cities);
and a swag of songs off the new album We Used To Think The Freeway Sounded Like A River including, The Boyfriends, Maybe We Were Both Born Blue, 43, Two Alone & Lonnie, which features one of my favourite ever song lines:

I ain’t going to worry about you anymore
You can keep living that hard if you want to
but the only point that you got now is dying
I saw your aunt in the store, she couldnt keep from saying
horrible things about you, but the thing is they’re all true

Vlautin and Eccles are the perfect pairing on stage. They look at ease with each other and at all times are in sync, Eccles’ guitar flourishes rounding out Willy’s well strummed rhythms.

One of the real highlights for me was their performance of three of the postcards from Post to Wire (here’s a link to one of them). The tail-between-legs, apologetic ramblings of Walter to his good friend Pete showcase Vlautin as one of the most innovative musical storytellers of this or any other generation.

At the end of the night the room is smiling, one of my friends looks at me and says he has written three new poems in his head, and we are all then out into a night filled with stars, Vlautin’s words illuminated in all of us, lucky enough to have been in the room with a truly gifted artist.

For those who couldn’t make it along, you can listen to an interview with Willy live from the Sydney Writers Festival here.

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The New Folk XIII – Vlautin, Felice & Lanegan

The touring circuit is hitting a mid-year peak, with a glut of great singer/songwriters hitting our shores in the coming months. Here’s a taste of some of the artists I am anticipating great shows from in the months of May, June and July.

We Used to Think The River Sounded Like a Freeway – Willy Vlautin & Dan Eccles

Willy Vlautin is undoubtedly one of the best storytellers to ever pick up a guitar. He has been described as ‘the Dylan of the dispossesed’ and likened to authors such as John Steinbeck for his crisply realised images of characters at the end of their rope. And for the first time, Australian audiences are getting a chance to see Willy (accompanied by Dan Eccles) play live, thanks to the roaring success of his band Richmond Fontaine’s eighth album, We Used to Think the Freewat Sounded Like a River and more importantly his critically accalimed third novel, Lean On Pete. Willy is in Australia as part of the Sydney Writers Festival, but Brisbane also gets a look in on Saturday May 29, with Willy reading and talking about Lean on Pete at Avid Reader at 4pm and then playing a set from the Richmond Fontaine back catalogue at The Troubadour that night. Tickets for both these events are now available and I am sure they are not going to last… artists like Vlautin are a rare commodity.

One More American Song – Simone Felice

Another rare commodity is Simone Felice (The Felice Brothers, The Duke & The King). Felice, like Vlautin, is an acclaimed singer/songwriter, who has also had great success as a poet and experimental novelist (Goodbye Amelia, Hail Mary Full of Holes). One More American song is an example of Felice’s lyrical richness. In the song he remembers Johnny, a boy from school with fiery red hair, who, thanks to the horrors of war has become the king of bottle tops, pushing shopping carts in a parking lot. It is this kind of raw narrative that Felice pens so well. And like Vlautin, Felice is making his way to Australia for the first time too, but unfortunately Brisbane is not part of the tour… Sydney and Melbourne only. Maybe next time…

Bombed – Mark Lanegan

From his days leading Seattle grunge gods Screaming Trees, to cameos with Queens of the Stoneage, Isobell Campbell, Soulsavers & The Twilight Singers, Mark Lanegan’s voice has become a sort after instrument. It has that whiskey-soaked, lived-in-leathery versatility that can stretch effortlessly from blues to country, gospel to full-tilt rock. Lanegan is like a heady mix of Johnny Cash and Charles Bukowski, most at home telling tales of the underworld, where drug deals, petty violence and squalid love affairs are common place. So if you like your stories seedy, get along to one of Lanegan’s Australian shows this July. He plays The Zoo in Brisbane on July 9.

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Left to the Flood: The New Folk XII

There are albums that come into your life that you know will stay with you forever, that etch themselves somewhere deep and continue to reveal themselves with every listen… two such albums have come into my life in the last week: High VioletThe National & True Love Cast Out All EvilRoky Erickson with Okkervil River. Here’s a taste from each of these albums; these songs are sure to make that Autumn sun seem somehow warmer on the skin.

Runaway – The National

‘There’s no, saving anything, now you’re swallowing the shine of the sun…’ The opening line of Runaway is just one of the lines that has lodged its barb firmly in  my psyche. The rest of the lyric is just as unforgettable:

‘What makes you think I’m enjoying being left to the flood?/ We got another thing coming undone/ and it’s taking us over/ We don’t bleed, when we don’t fight/ go ahead, go ahead, throw your arms in the air tonight’

Runaway showcases Matt Berninger’s sweet baritone during one of the album’s softer moments.Throughout the album, Berninger moves from moments of personal catharsis to the blindingly surreal, while the band sound majestic, swooping divinely in and out of Berninger’s lyrical rabbit holes.

I was carried to Ohio in a swarm of bees – Bloodbuzz Ohio

I’m a confident liar, I put my head in the oven so you know where I’ve been – Conversation 16

Cover me in rag and bone/ and sympathy/ cause I don’t want to get over you – Sorrow

This album is going to be on super high rotation for some time… you can listen to the complete album here, prior to it’s official release on May 11.

True Love Cast Out All Evil – Roky Erickson with Okkervil River

When the sounds of crackling opener, Devotional Number One floated out of my speakers, my spinal fluid began to bubble. It reminded me of the time when I heard the first of the Cash/Rubin collaborations and how I knew then, that I had a lot of catching up to do… that I had somehow in my youth managed to overlook the genius of Johnny Cash. While I have long been a fan of Okkervil River, I have lived almost 39 years on this earth without any knowledge of Roky Erickson… thankfully that has all changed. This is a deeply spiritual album. Okkervil River frontman, Will Sheff’s liner notes (which are worth the price of the album alone) detail Erickson’s well-publicised demons, including a stint in a Texan Psychiatric Hospital and how the voices in his head, caged him for years. It is these experiences that Erickson has primarily drawn on during the writing of this album… but there is no wallowing here. This is an album of hope, redemption and the healing power of music and Will Sheff’s production is absolutely perfect. In the softer moments you can hear Roky’s lungs rattle as he draws breath and in the fuzzed up rocker, John Lawman, you can hear his spittle coat the mic. Albums like this don’t come around often…

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