Tag Archives: Andrew Phillips

New Junicho: Between Thistles (Links #9 – #10)

Responses to Link #10:

It was a thrill to see the energy of the gendai phase continue; the verse on offer for link #10 vary from the wonderfully  satirical, ‘Mad Katter’s tea party’ (John) and ‘budgie’s snuggle’ (Trish), through the razor sharp political commentary of ‘a new man rises’ (Phillip), the deep resonance of ‘soldier biscuits for sale’ (Chris) and the natural beauty of ‘election promises’ (Vuong).

After reading each poem multiple times, I became overwhelmed at the state of politics in our nation. Such is the power of so many of the links submitted; and in this power lies possibility. The Junicho would be richer for the addition of many of these poems, but there must be one that owns the 10th position and propels us towards an ending…

There are two poems that I have juggled for a number of hours now; placing each one into the Junicho, reading and re-reading the complete poem and then considering where it could lead us… the two poems are Chris’s ‘soldier biscuits for sale’  and Phillip’s ‘a new man rises’. In making my choice, I have decided to go with the directness of Phillip’s link and the energy it generates in leaping forward from Cindy’s ‘waking up’. The use of the word rises is the engine that propels this poem and while I might be showing my political leanings with this selection, this startling image confirmed my fear of the long winter we may wake to post the upcoming federal election…

I will, however, make one edit to the poem, and that is the removal of the brackets around the second line. It is my belief that the poem works more powerfully without them.

So with link #10 decided, link #11 is now open. Link #11 completes the six cultural links by calling for 3 lines with a music reference. After witnessing the uninhibited energy of Black Sabbath last night, I am eager to hear how each of you will make your words sing.

Take the leap and spread the word…

*****

Between Thistles: A New Junicho
Started: 12 April 2013 – Finished:
Written between:
Ashley Capes, Simon Kindt, Chloe Callistemon, Chris Lynch, Trish Reid, John Wainwright, Lee-Anne Davie, Andrew Phillips, Cindy Keong, Phillip Ellis,

Link #1 (3 lines) – hokku / shasei

between thistles
the crane’s
Egyptian walk

(Ashley Capes)

Link #2 (2 lines) – waki / cultural (literature)

the noose of a circling skein
called down by Carver’s barreled goose

(Simon Kindt)

Link #3 (3 lines) – daisan / cultural (film)

fan rotors beat
The End
to the smell of napalm

(Chloe Callistemon)

Link #4 (2 lines) – verse / shasei

recycling at 2:30am
moonlight on bitumen

(Chris Lynch)

Link #5 (3 lines) – verse / shasei

moth seeks out
only dark spaces
tired I turn off the light

(Trish Reid)

Link #6 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (art)

Caravaggio fades in from black
is that a pallet knife?

(John Wainwright)

Link #7 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (religion)

he makes the sign
with crossed fingers
crucifix

(Lee-Anne Davie)

Link #8 (2 lines) – verse / gendai

global autumn
H5N1 migrates

(Andrew Phillips)

Link #9 (3 lines) – verse / gendai

waking up
with winter
beside me

(Cindy Keong)

Link #10 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (politics)

a new man rises
such rough beast

(Phillip Ellis)

Link #11 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (music)
Link #12 (2 lines) – ageku / shasei

* shasei – sketched from life – lived experience, observational, uncontrived.
* gendai – modernist – atypical structure, tone or content.

*****

Response to Link #9:

I am just home after two massive nights of poetry (one launching Brisbane New Voices IV, which I will share details of very soon), and am eager to keep the Junicho moving. That said, my eyes are finding it hard to focus, so tonight, I am going to keep it brief…

Again, I have been swept away by the playful energy of the poems on offer for link #9. I have been checking in regularly and this gendai section has given me a genuine rush.

Many of these poems have seeded themselves in my brain, keeping me company and filling my head with their wildness. Several, will remain there for a long time… such is their resonance.

These poems include, Trish’s ‘she misses his cheek’, Cindy’s ‘waking up’, Chris’s ‘fever sweats’ and John’s uproarious, ‘number nine’.

So which one has made the leap into Between Thistles… for link #9 I have decided to wake up with winter and in doing so, welcome Cindy into the Junicho.

This means, we are now calling for link #10 – 2 lines with a political theme. I’ve got a feeling this one is going to keep the freewheeling energy of the last two links!

Leap boldly,

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New Junicho: Between Thistles (Links #7 – #8)

Responses to link #8:

With 20+ poems on offer for this link, I don’t feel I am able to do them all justice in a single response, so instead of responding to each poem, I felt it would be best to first, share some of my own thoughts on gendai haiku and then share the 3 poems that elbowed their way to the final shortlist.

First of all, here is another enlightening link with regards gendai haiku: http://gendaihaiku.com/.

To quote from Shiki, ‘Haiku advances only when it departs from the traditional style’, and so it is that gendai haiku provides one way forward for the form, welcoming innovation and encouraging writers (as Martin Lucas so elegantly put it in his essay, Haiku as Poetic Spell) to embrace the ‘little awkwardnesses’ and to resist the pressures towards conformity, complacency and mere competence. As well as the wealth of information that is available at Gendai Haiku, I also recommend immersing yourself in journals such as Roadrunner and Presence. Both journals continue to publish groundbreaking work; work that challenges the traditional paradigm.

And for me, reading has always been the way forward… to read and have an awareness of groundbreaking work is to be one step closer to writing it.

What I loved most about the offerings for link #8, was the freedom of their spirit. I thank you all for your innovation and sense of playfulness… to me, both are vital to the art of haiku.

While many of the poems here would add a richness to the Junicho – Rachael’s wildly stitched together words and Trish and Lee-Anne’s intense use of colour – there are three that continue to pull me deeper into their realm. The 3 poems, in no particular order are, Andrew’s ‘global autumn’, Dhyan’s ‘damn!’ and Cindy’s ‘remorse’. Each of these embraces the spirit of gendai and offers a unique way forward for the poem. They are playful, provocative and brimming with possibility.

So which way did I leap?

I couldn’t resist  flying into the swirling genetics of Andrew’s ‘global autumn’.

This means link #9 is now open! For link #9 We remain in the world of gendai haiku, so keep the freewheeling words coming… this time, we are looking for three lines.

Enjoy!

*****

Between Thistles: A New Junicho
Started: 12 April 2013 – Finished:
Written between:
Ashley Capes, Simon Kindt, Chloe Callistemon, Chris Lynch, Trish Reid, John Wainwright, Lee-Anne Davie

Link #1 (3 lines) – hokku / shasei

between thistles
the crane’s
Egyptian walk

(Ashley Capes)

Link #2 (2 lines) – waki / cultural (literature)

the noose of a circling skein
called down by Carver’s barreled goose

(Simon Kindt)

Link #3 (3 lines) – daisan / cultural (film)

fan rotors beat
The End
to the smell of napalm

(Chloe Callistemon)

Link #4 (2 lines) – verse / shasei

recycling at 2:30am
moonlight on bitumen

(Chris Lynch)

Link #5 (3 lines) – verse / shasei

moth seeks out
only dark spaces
tired I turn off the light

(Trish Reid)

Link #6 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (art)

Caravaggio fades in from black
is that a pallet knife?

(John Wainwright)

Link #7 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (religion)

he makes the sign
with crossed fingers
crucifix

(Lee-Anne Davie)

Link #8 (2 lines) – verse / gendai

global autumn
H5N1 migrates

(Andrew Phillips)

Link #9 (3 lines) – verse / gendai
Link #10 (2 lines) – verse / cultural (politics)
Link #11 (3 lines) – verse / cultural (music)
Link #12 (2 lines) – ageku / shasei

* shasei – sketched from life – lived experience, observational, uncontrived.
* gendai – modernist – atypical structure, tone or content.

*****

Responses to Link #7:

Again, I have been swept away by the energy of this poem and the poets who have stepped up to the ‘link #7 plate’ and had a swing…

Vuong starts proceedings with a small handful of poems, beginning with the warmth of dawn and a blessing, moving to the chill of winter and the exposed garden angel and arriving at, for me, the finest of his three poems, ‘searching for truth’. This image continues to resonate with me; the gentle movement of a page lifting in the breeze shows us that ‘the truth’ reveals itself when we too are open to its arrival; Chris offers a quietly playful image. The idea of a beanie itching the head of the old jizo (protector of deceased children) during meditation put a wide smile on my face; Phillip’s offering has a harder edge; in reading this, I sensed the watchmaker had lost his faith, after losing his sight; John engages in an inner dialogue and in doing so talks himself into having a little drink; Rachael drifts off during mass and despite being roused by a sharp elbow to the ribs, continues to question what it is to believe… the final line filled my head with the possibility of what she was dreaming about; Trish presents an image of beauty and devastation, where deaf men sign their cries; something (delightfully) wicked this way comes in the form of Lee-Anne’s poem, as she questions her faith by crossing her fingers while making the sign of the cross; Cindy gives us an image of vast natural beauty and locates us in the upper air of the Himalayas; and Andrew watches as the dog makes short work of the holy book… couldn’t help but think of that age old homework excuse, ‘my dog ate it.’

So many stepping stones, each one providing a solid platform for the poem to move forward. Before I make my decision, let me thank you all again for making this such a joy.

Now, to choose that stone. Four particular poems have had a jostling match in my head, but for link #7, I have gone with Lee-Anne’s satirical take on the sign of the cross.

This means we move into the gendai phase of the poem and the call is now open for link #8… 3 modernist lines that will take the poem in the direction of left field.

Embrace that risk-taking feeling!

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Snake Weather: A Summer Renga (part iv)

Snake Weather has stretched its full length… it was a wonderful experience working with such a diversity of voices and watching how each poet shifted the energy of the poem. It is a renga that I feel deserves repeated reads, so I have included the links to parts i, ii and iii here so that you can take it all in. There is much to enjoy!

Snake Weather (part i)
Snake Weather (part ii)
Snake Weather (part iii)

Snake Weather
A Summer Kasen Renga
Started: February 10, 2013 – Finished: April 14, 2013

Written by / between:
David S, Andy S, Cindy K, Katherine B, Chris L, Trish R, John W, Helen R, Andrew P

Moon CLK

[photograph by Cindy Keong]

*

gloves no longer needed
fingertips   cigarettes   pink

DS

*

Easter moon
in one hand
a beer and a crucifix

AS

*

raking red ficus berries
she considers a change in lipstick

CK

*

cold wind
not noticing
her silences

GN

*

inside the cavern
our eyes adjust

CL

*

wooden beat
of her walking stick
missing

TR

*

at High Copse the robin left him
cutting an ash sapling

JW

*

A quick shower
cherry blossom petals
carpet the sidewalk

HR

*

both of them arrive late
to the opening matinée

AP

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Snake Weather: A Summer Renga (part iii)

As I post this, Snake Weather is crawling off on its final leg… so for now, please enjoy this third phase of the renga written by David Stavanger, Andy Smerdon, Cindy Keong, Graham Nunn, Chris Lynch, Trish Reid, John Wainwright, Helen Ross and Andrew Phillips.

CLK Snake Weather

[photograph by Cindy Keong]

he wears shoes to bed
she finds bones in her shoes
Spring cleaning

DS

*

bitter hands rip him
from the wedding photo

AS

*

again and again
she strikes – the familiar
sound of thunder

CK

*

the wild plum
rolls to a stop

GN

*

more insects
at the kitchen fluoro
endless rain

CL

*

frankincense dusk
just an oud and her voice

TR

*

mercury rises
pommie bastards are wet
dreaming of EIIR

JW

*

wine stains on the carpet
this broken heart

HR

*

electrostatic therapy
shock jumps of laughter
with the nieces

AP

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Snake Weather: A Summer Renga (part ii)

The summer ginko group have now reached the half-way mark of their ginko. Here’s links 10-18 written by / between: David Stavanger, Andy Smerdon, Cindy Keong, Katherine Battersby, Chris Lynch, Trish Reid, John Wainwright, Helen Ross, Andrew Phillips for you to enjoy.

snake weather part ii

[photograph by Cindy Keong]

promotional sale
we buy each other white

DS

*

passion fades
in the dune grass
still swimming

AS

*

an incoming tide draws
closer the stars

CK

*

winter’s bone
the city sleeps
beneath his pale face

KB

*

the letter must be written
snowfield at dawn

CL

*

expecting a call
from my sister
not feeling hungry

TR

*

she waves her pony tail
flies away

JW

*

naked
spring buds dress
the branches

HR

*

one eye
of the submerged frog

AP

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Snake Weather: A Summer Renga

Our recent ginko through Karawatha Forest has spun off into a summer ginko. The group have been sparking off each other, resulting in some really exciting leaps. Here’s the first quarter of Snake Weather, written by / between: David Stavanger, Andy Smerdon, Cindy Keong, Katherine Battersby, Chris Lynch, Trish Reid, John Wainwright, Helen Ross, Andrew Phillips.

Snake Weather CLK

[photograph by Cindy Keong]

snake weather
he kisses his teenage daughter
on the mouth

DS

*

storm clouds hide
an innocent sky

AS

*

at the roadside
the empty arms
of a mother

CK

*

cane fields watch
with a promise of fire

KB

*

she bleeds out
in the back paddock
harvest moon

CL

*

red flowers falling
they await the results

TR

*

black parrots’ beaks
in the heliconia
skeletons rise from the woods

JW

*

limbs entwine
love whispers its melody

HR

*

she falls back
breathless into lounge arms
rolling credits

AP

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SpeedPoets at The Hideaway tomorrow!

Brisbane’s longest running poetry event, SpeedPoets, rises from its summer slumber tomorrow, and takes the stage at their brand new home, The Hideaway (188 Brunswick St, Fortitude Valley).

hideaway logo

While we may have been on hiatus for the last few months, there has been plenty happening. The winners of the 2012 SpeedPoets Open Mic Championships are currently being featured over at Stilts. This week, the spotlight is on Chloe Callistemon, so head on over and get a hit of her poetry, on the screen and in your ear (yep, there’s audio). You can also read an interview with Sheish Money, one of tomorrow’s features, over at the SpeedPoets site.

Tomorrow marks the beginning of the 13th year of SpeedPoets, which in this age of the throw-away, is pretty special. Sheish Money is one of the few that have been there from the very first venue (downstairs at Belushis), so it is fitting that he will be fronting his new band, Moveable Feast and filling the room with his guitar roar and booming vocal. Also featuring tomorrow is 2012 SpeedPoets Open Mic Champion, Andrew Phillips. And to make things even more special, Andrew will be inviting Tiggy Johnson up to the stage for a poem or two from their stunning collection, That Zero Year.

But let’s not forget you… that’s right, you! The SpeedPoets Open Mic is what drives the event, so make sure you are there with a poem or three tucked in your pocket, ready to make them sing! You may just be named Call-Back-Poet of the month and have the honour of finishing the day with a set of 2-3 poems. Each of the monthly Call-Back-Poets will also be given a feature spot at the final gig of the year in November and be in the running to win cash prizes and the title, 2013 SpeedPoets Open Mic Champion.

See you all at the Hideaway tomorrow!

SpeedPoets first gig for 2013
Date: Saturday February 23
Venue: The Hideaway, 188 Brunswick St, Fortitude Valley
Time: Doors at 1:30pm for a 2pm Open Mic Start
Entry: Gold Coin Donation

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