QPF 2012 Feature Poet: Ray Liversidge (part v)

It has been a real thrill talking with Ray Liversidge this past couple of weeks and I am now looking forward to seeing him step on to the QPF stage so that I can hear his ‘dead-poet-portraits’ come to life. Ray and I wrap up our conversation today, talking the art of collaboration and future projects.

Catch Ray Liversidge live at QPF 2012 in the following sessions:

Strands Upon The Pillow (Sat 25 Aug 1.30pm) and Unseen Strings Connecting (Sun 26 Aug, 2pm). Ray will also read as part of A Million Bright Things, along with every other artist on the program, on Saturday August 25 from 8pm.

ALS: As I have mentioned before, with No Suspicious Circumstances, you collaborated with artist, Kathryn Bowden. I would love to hear more about how you worked together to produce the book and how you found the experience.

RL: When I first set out on this adventure of writing about dead poets it was always my dream to have illustrations of the poets to complement the poems. I did think that the dream would remain just that as it is hard enough to get a book of poems published let alone have the luxury of it being illustrated. Well, the planets aligned when I found Littlefox Press which is the publishing arm of Alice & Co run by Christine Mathieu. They specialise in books which may not be suited to the commercial requirements of larger trade publishing houses.

Kathryn would consider herself more of an artist than an illustrator, however she accepted the challenge of producing the portraits of the poets. We sourced photos and images of the poets and Kathryn insisted on reading my poems and even undertook research to find out more about the poets. The best way to describe our working relationship is to say that we were on the same page from day one! I couldn’t be more happy with the illustrations, and working with Kathryn and Christine has been the most exciting, satisfying and enjoyable experience of my writing career.

ALS: Will you be incorporating Kathryn’s images into your live performance of the work?

RL: Yes. Unfortunately, the book will not be ready for the festival, but at least the audience will get to hear me read some of the poems and see the relevant illustrations projected on a screen.

ALS: With No Suspicious Circumstances due for release, what projects are you currently working on?

RL: I have recently finished a 400 line poem on an incident which took place in Oradour-sur-Glane, France, towards the end of WW2. I am currently doing reseach for a poem on a 4th century martyr. I’m experimenting with the long line… And so it goes!

**********

Ray and I both agreed it seemed most fitting to sign off with a poem and one of Kathryn’s images.

The path ends where the wood ends

Like Dylan, you died in your thirty-ninth year.
Like Dylan, born with the same name, the same
Urge to live the writer’s life, however austere.
Yet, to you, nature was no metaphor, feigned
Or fabled dingle; but dell, down, wind and rain
Of your beloved Hampshire. Robert Frost moved next door.
So did the war. More than a hundred poems came.
In one you stepped out … into an April morning, called
Into a dark and cloistered wood on your last Wordsworthian walk.

[Edward Thomas was born in 1878 in London to Welsh parents. Although a Georgian poet he wrote with a modern sensibility about the impact that time and war have on country life. Thomas enlisted in 1914 and was sent to France in early 1917. On the first day of the Battle of Arras on 9 April 1917 he was killed by a bomb blast.]

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3 Comments

Filed under interviews/artist profiles, poetry & publishing

3 responses to “QPF 2012 Feature Poet: Ray Liversidge (part v)

  1. so many of the great writers died or chose to die way too early…a very fine poem to honor them.. dylan thomas’ “do not go gentle…” is one of my all time fav villanelles

  2. hi claudia – ray here. thanks for this comment and others you’ve left. dylan is the first poem in the series and this is the second one. i’ll be reading both as well as others at the festival so hope you can come along and listen. all the best.

  3. What a wonderful collaboration – I just love the portrait 🙂 and the poem is very moving.

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