Postcard

The bed is unmade. A few books are stacked on a shelf near the window. By the side of the bed, a carved wooden table holds up a bowl of objects: a penlight, a matchbook, a deck of cards. Next to the bowl is an unstamped postcard of the Jack Evans Porpoise Pool in Coolangatta. My brother picks it up and flips it over, looks at it without expression. He turns and gazes out of the window for a few seconds, then places the card face down on the table and moves on. I stretch over to read the card. It is addressed to our father. I recognise the writing, the gradual lean of letters. I follow the movement of words, jumping from one to the other, knowing, with every line, that this is my Great Grandmother’s handwriting. Maybe this was the last thing she wrote? Maybe the last thing she touched? Then I have to stop thinking. I mustn’t imagine the words she was going to write. I prop the card up against a book. It stares back at me, never sent, never filled in.

packing boxes
the stories
she took with her

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under poetry

2 responses to “Postcard

  1. Fantastic! Lovely the way you have set the scene so that there are a number of questions. I am intrigued by the brother – he is either less observant than you (and this would be my guess given that your powers of observation are evident in your poetry) or he is upset by the card or by something else that you might be indirectly referring to and not willing to show his emotions.

    • gnunn

      This was the result of a dream… but has alot of truth about it. My brother is more an ‘in the head person’ always looking skyward while I am always looking down… trying to uncover the depth of things.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s